Norma relacionada
Venezuela
Practice Relating to Rule 100. Fair Trial Guarantees
Section N. Non bis in idem
Venezuela’s Law on the Protection of Children and Adolescents (2007) states: “The remission, dismissal or acquittal of a case impedes a new investigation or trial against an adolescent for the same act, even if the charge is modified or if new circumstances come to light.” 
Venezuela, Law on the Protection of Children and Adolescents, 2007, Article 547.
Venezuela’s Penal Procedure Code (2009), which is applicable to the prosecution of war crimes, states:
No one may be prosecuted more than once for the same act.
However, a new prosecution will be admissible when:
1. The first was carried out before a tribunal that did not have competency to hear the matter, and it concluded the proceedings for this reason.
2. When the first was rejected due to shortcomings in the … [proceedings]. 
Venezuela, Penal Procedure Code, 2009, Article 20.
The Code further states: “The … termination of proceedings … [p]revents any new prosecution for the same act against the indicted or accused [person] in whose favour the proceedings ruled, except as provided for in Article 20 of this Code”. 
Venezuela, Penal Procedure Code, 2009, Article 319.
Venezuela’s Penal Procedure Code (2012), which is applicable to the prosecution of war crimes, states:
No one may be prosecuted more than once for the same act.
A new prosecution will be admissible when:
1. The first was carried out before a tribunal that did not have competency to hear the matter, and it concluded the proceedings for this reason.
2. When the first was rejected due to shortcomings in the … [proceedings]. 
Venezuela, Penal Procedure Code, 2012, Article 20.
The Code further states: “The … termination of proceedings … [p]revents any new prosecution for the same act against the indicted or accused [person] in whose favour the proceedings ruled, except as provided for in Article 20 of this Code”. 
Venezuela, Penal Procedure Code, 2012, Article 301.
In 2001, in the Ballestas case, the Colombian Government requested the preventive detention and extradition of a Colombian citizen belonging to the armed group known as the Ejército de Liberación Nacional (National Liberation Army) for the crimes of rebellion, kidnapping, wrongful death, seizure and diversion of aircraft. The Chamber of Criminal Appeals of Venezuela’s Supreme Tribunal of Justice stated:
The Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela and the Republics of Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador and Peru signed the Bolivarian Extradition Agreement on 18 July 1911 in Caracas … [which provides]:
Article 5.- Extradition shall not be granted in the following cases:
c) If the individual whose extradition is requested has already been judged and set free or has served his or her sentence, or if the acts of which he or she is accused have been the object of an amnesty or a pardon. 
Venezuela, Supreme Tribunal of Justice, Ballestas case, Judgment, 10 December 2001, pp. 4–5.
[emphasis in original]