Norma relacionada
Rwanda
Practice Relating to Rule 158. Prosecution of War Crimes
Rwanda’s Law Setting up Gacaca Jurisdictions (2001) aims
to organize the putting on trial of persons prosecuted for having, between 1 October 1990 and 31 December 1994, committed acts qualified and punished by the Penal Code and which constitute:
… crimes of genocide or crimes against humanity as defined by the [1948 Genocide Convention], by the [1949 Geneva Convention IV and the 1977 Additional Protocols], as well as in the [1968 UN Convention on the Non-Applicability of Statutory Limitations to War Crimes and Crimes against Humanity]. 
Rwanda, Law Setting up Gacaca Jurisdictions, 2001, Article 1.
Article One: Purpose of this Organic Law
This Organic Law terminates Gacaca Courts charged with prosecuting and trying persons accused of the crime of genocide perpetrated against Tutsi and other crimes against humanity committed between October 1, 1990 and December 31, 1994.
It also determines mechanism of solving pending issues that were under their jurisdiction and any issues, which may rise after.
Article 2: Termination of the Gacaca Courts
Gacaca Courts charged with prosecuting and trying persons accused of the crime of genocide perpetrated against Tutsi and other crimes against humanity committed between October 1, 1990 and December 31, 1994, are hereby terminated.
Article 3: Laws governing the prosecution and punishment of acts constituting the crime of Genocide perpetrated against Tutsi and other crimes against humanity
The prosecution and punishment of acts constituting the crime of genocide perpetrated against Tutsi and other crimes against humanity which were committed between October 1, 1990 and December 31, 1994 in the jurisdiction of Gacaca Courts shall be exercised by competent organs according to laws in force applicable in these matters.
Article 4: Acts constituting the crime of genocide perpetrated against Tutsi and other crimes against humanity within the jurisdiction of the Intermediate Court
The following offences shall be tried at the first instance by the Intermediate Court:
In 2010, in its initial report to the Committee on the Rights of the Child under the 2000 Optional Protocol on the Involvement of Children in Armed Conflict, Rwanda stated:
If children could have committed crimes while in armed groups or armed forces, Rwanda has a Military Penal Code that in fact constitutes the Fourth Title of the Penal Code [(1977)]. Article 451 specifies the manner in which military jurisdictions apply punishments to offences in these terms: “military jurisdictions apply to ordinary crimes, punishments enacted by ordinary criminal laws. As for military offences below, they apply punishments provided for by the Military Penal Code. To all offences and apart from exceptions provided for by the Military Penal [C]ode, they apply the general provisions of the Ordinary Penal Code”. In the final analysis, … [former child soldiers] who are guilty of committing crimes while in armed groups or armed forces would be judged on the basis of [the] Military Penal Code. These children could benefit from [the] mitigating circumstances of being minors provided for in Article 77 of the Penal Code [(1977)] as well as from any procedure in their favour provided for by the law. 
Rwanda, Initial report to the Committee on the Rights of the Child under the Optional Protocol on the Involvement of Children in Armed Conflict, 6 December 2011, UN Doc. CRC/C/OPAC/RWA/1, submitted 20 January 2010, § 175.