Norma relacionada
Peru
Practice Relating to Rule 88. Non-Discrimination
Peru’s Human Rights Charter of the Armed Forces (1994) states that non-discrimination, i.e. respect for all without any distinction on the grounds of nationality, race, religion, social condition or political opinion, is one of the three common principles of the 1949 Geneva Conventions which represent the minimum level of protection to which every human being is entitled. 
Peru, Derechos Humanos: Principios, Normas y Procedimientos, MFA 09-1, Comando Conjunto de las Fuerzas Armadas, Ministerio de Defensa, Ejército Peruano, Lima, Peru, May 1994, § 24.
Peru’s IHL Manual (2004) states: “People must not be discriminated against on the grounds of race, sex, language, religion, beliefs, political or other opinions, nationality, social standing, wealth or any other such criteria.” 
Peru, Manual de Derecho Internacional Humanitario para las Fuerzas Armadas, Resolución Ministerial Nº 1394-2004-DE/CCFFAA/CDIH-FFAA, Lima, 1 December 2004, § 32.l.
The manual contains a similar provision with respect to situations of non-international armed conflict:
Persons taking no active part in the hostilities, including members of armed forces who have laid down their arms and those placed hors de combat by sickness, wounds, detention or any other cause, shall in all circumstances be treated humanely, without any adverse distinction founded on race, colour, religion or faith, sex, birth or wealth, or any other similar criteria. 
Peru, Manual de Derecho Internacional Humanitario para las Fuerzas Armadas, Resolución Ministerial Nº 1394-2004-DE/CCFFAA/CDIH-FFAA, Lima, 1 December 2004, § 71.a.
Peru’s IHL and Human Rights Manual (2010) states:
There are … principles common to the [1949] Geneva Conventions and human rights law which represent a minimum level of protection to which every human person is entitled … [including] [n]on-discrimination, [that is to say] respect for all individuals without any distinction based on nationality, race, religion, social status [or] political opinion.
Regarding these fundamental guarantees, there is no exception whatsoever and they are binding both in times of peace and in times of armed conflict. 
Peru, Manual de Derecho Internacional Humanitario y Derechos Humanos para las Fuerzas Armadas, Resolución Ministerial No. 049-2010/DE/VPD, Lima, 21 May 2010, § 26, pp. 41–42.
With respect to situations of non-international armed conflict, the manual states:
Persons taking no active part in the hostilities, including members of armed forces who have laid down their arms and those placed hors de combat by sickness, wounds, detention or any other cause, shall in all circumstances be treated humanely, without any adverse distinction founded on race, colour, religion or faith, sex, birth or wealth, or any other similar criteria. 
Peru, Manual de Derecho Internacional Humanitario y Derechos Humanos para las Fuerzas Armadas, Resolución Ministerial No. 049-2010/DE/VPD, Lima, 21 May 2010, § 72(a), p. 270.
Peru’s Law on Internal Displacement (2004) states:
Internally displaced persons enjoy the same rights and freedoms under international and domestic law as do other persons in the country. They are not to be discriminated against in the enjoyment of their rights and freedoms merely because they are internally displaced. 
Peru, Law on Internal Displacement, 2004, Article 3.
Peru’s Regulations to the Law on Internal Displacement (2005) states:
Internally displaced persons have the same rights as other persons in the country, without prejudice to the special rights and duties recognized in the Law [on Internal Displacement (2004)] and the present Regulations. National and international laws are applicable to internally displaced persons without discrimination of any kind, particularly without discrimination based on them being displaced persons. 
Peru, Regulations to the Law on Internal Displacement, 2005, Article 5.
Peru’s Decree on the Use of Force by the Armed Forces (2010) states that “persons placed hors de combat for … any … reason must in all circumstances be treated … without any unfavourable distinction based on race, colour, religion or belief, sex, birth, socio-economic status or any other similar criterion.” 
Peru, Decree on the Use of Force by the Armed Forces, 2010, Article 8.2.1.
Peru’s IHL Manual (2004) states:
a. Medical personnel providing medical services in armed conflicts have a duty to respect the principles of medical ethics as in peacetime. They must behave in the following way:
(4) refrain, in the performance of their duties, from any form of discrimination on the grounds of religion, nationality, race, political opinions or social standing;
Medical ethics in armed conflict are the same as in peacetime, taking into account that:
(3) in emergency situations, medical assistance must be provided without discrimination, the only relevant criterion for determining priority of treatment being the degree of medical urgency.
c. …
In accordance with the principle of non-discrimination, there must be no distinction in determining priority of treatment founded on race, political opinion, religion or faith, sex, birth, language, nationality, social standing or wealth, or any other similar criteria. 
Peru, Manual de Derecho Internacional Humanitario para las Fuerzas Armadas, Resolución Ministerial Nº 1394-2004-DE/CCFFAA/CDIH-FFAA, Lima, 1 December 2004, § 84.a and c; see also § 32.l.
Peru’s IHL and Human Rights Manual (2010) states:
a. Medical personnel providing medical services in armed conflicts have a duty to respect the principles of medical ethics as in peacetime. They must behave in the following way:
(4) refrain, in the performance of their duties, from any form of discrimination on the grounds of religion, nationality, race, political opinion or social standing;
Medical ethics in armed conflict are the same as in peacetime, taking into account that:
(3) in emergency situations, medical assistance must be provided without discrimination
c. … In accordance with the principle of non-discrimination, there must be no distinction in determining priority of treatment founded on race, political opinion, religion or faith, sex, birth, language, nationality, social standing, wealth, or any other similar criterion. 
Peru, Manual de Derecho Internacional Humanitario y Derechos Humanos para las Fuerzas Armadas, Resolución Ministerial No. 049-2010/DE/VPD, Lima, 21 May 2010, § 75(a) and (c), pp. 273–274; see also § 33(1), p. 251.
Peru’s Decree on the Use of Force by the Armed Forces (2010) states that “persons placed hors de combat by illness [or] wounds … must in all circumstances be treated … without any unfavourable distinction based on race, colour, religion or belief, sex, birth, socio-economic status or any other similar criterion.” 
Peru, Decree on the Use of Force by the Armed Forces, 2010, Article 8.2.1.
Peru’s Code of Military and Police Justice (2006) states: “In a Military and Police Confinement Centre, any form of discrimination based on nationality, age, gender, race, religion, economic or social status, legal status, military or police rank, or other ground shall be prohibited.” 
Peru, Code of Military and Police Justice, 2006, Article 470.
Peru’s Decree on the Use of Force by the Armed Forces (2010) states:
Persons who have laid down their arms as well as persons placed hors de combat by … detention … must in all circumstances be treated … without any unfavourable distinction based on race, colour, religion or belief, sex, birth, socio-economic status or any other similar criterion. 
Peru, Decree on the Use of Force by the Armed Forces, 2010, Article 8.2.1.
Peru’s IHL Manual (2004) states:
The term [apartheid] comprises inhuman acts committed for the purpose of establishing and maintaining the domination by one racial group of persons over any other racial group of persons and systematically oppressing them.
a. International criminal responsibility applies, irrespective of the motive involved, to individuals, members of organizations and institutions and representatives of the State who, whatever their country of residence, promote apartheid.
b. Apartheid committed during an international armed conflict is a war crime. 
Peru, Manual de Derecho Internacional Humanitario para las Fuerzas Armadas, Resolución Ministerial Nº 1394-2004-DE/CCFFAA/CDIH-FFAA, Lima, 1 December 2004, Annex 9, Glossary of Terms.
Peru’s IHL and Human Rights Manual (2010) states in its Glossary of Terms:
The term [apartheid] comprises … inhuman acts committed for the purpose of establishing and maintaining the domination by one racial group of persons over any other racial group of persons and systematically oppressing them.
a. International criminal responsibility applies, irrespective of the motive involved, to individuals, members of organizations and institutions and representatives of the State who, whatever their country of residence, promote apartheid.
b. Apartheid committed during an international armed conflict is a war crime. 
Peru, Manual de Derecho Internacional Humanitario y Derechos Humanos para las Fuerzas Armadas, Resolución Ministerial No. 049-2010/DE/VPD, Lima, 21 May 2010, p. 394.
Peru’s Penal Code (1991), as amended in 1998, punishes the carrying out of practices of apartheid. 
Peru, Penal Code, 1991, as amended in 1998, Article 319.