Norma relacionada
Peru
Practice Relating to Rule 47. Attacks against Persons Hors de Combat
Section B. Specific categories of persons hors de combat
Peru’s Human Rights Charter of the Security Forces (1991) states that it is prohibited to kill defenceless persons and adds that “the life of captured, surrendered and wounded persons must be respected”. 
Peru, Derechos Humanos: Decálogo de las Fuerzas del Orden, Comando Conjunto de las Fuerzas Armadas, Ministerio de Defensa, Ejército Peruano, 1991, pp. 6 and 7.
Peru’s IHL Manual (2004) states: “Attacks on people taking no part in the hostilities or those who have ceased to participate in the fighting (wounded, sick or shipwrecked combatants, prisoners of war and civilians) … are considered to be war crimes.” 
Peru, Manual de Derecho Internacional Humanitario para las Fuerzas Armadas, Resolución Ministerial Nº 1394-2004-DE/CCFFAA/CDIH-FFAA, Lima, 1 December 2004, § 31.a.
The manual defines the term “wounded, sick or shipwrecked” as:
The wounded and sick are all those persons, whether military or civilian, who, because of their physical or mental condition, are in need of medical assistance or care and refrain from any act of hostility.
The shipwrecked are all those persons, whether military or civilian, who are in peril at sea or in other waters. They continue to be considered shipwrecked until the rescue operation has ended. 
Peru, Manual de Derecho Internacional Humanitario para las Fuerzas Armadas, Resolución Ministerial Nº 1394-2004-DE/CCFFAA/CDIH-FFAA, Lima, 1 December 2004, § 33.a.(3).
Peru’s IHL and Human Rights Manual (2010) states: “Attacks on people taking no part in the hostilities or those who have ceased to participate in the fighting (wounded, sick or shipwrecked combatants, prisoners of war, civilians) … are considered to be war crimes.” 
Peru, Manual de Derecho Internacional Humanitario y Derechos Humanos para las Fuerzas Armadas, Resolución Ministerial No. 049-2010/DE/VPD, Lima, 21 May 2010, § 32(a), p. 248; see also § 36(a), p. 297 and § 100(a), p. 297 (prisoners of war).
The manual defines the term “wounded, sick or shipwrecked” as:
The wounded and sick are all those persons, whether military or civilian, who, because of their physical or mental condition, are in need of medical assistance or care and refrain from any act of hostility.
The shipwrecked are all those persons, whether military or civilian, who are in peril at sea or in other waters. They continue to be considered shipwrecked until the rescue operation has ended. 
Peru, Manual de Derecho Internacional Humanitario y Derechos Humanos para las Fuerzas Armadas, Resolución Ministerial No. 049-2010/DE/VPD, Lima, 21 May 2010, § 34(a)(1), p. 252.
Peru’s Code of Military Justice (1980) punishes the persons “who finish off … the surrendered or wounded enemy who does not put up resistance”. 
Peru, Code of Military Justice, 1980, Article 94.
Peru’s Code of Military and Police Justice (2006) states:
Any member of the military or police who in the context of an international or non-international armed conflict wounds a member of the enemy armed forces or a combatant of the adverse party after he or she has unconditionally surrendered or is in any other way hors de combat shall be imprisoned for a period of no less than six and no more than 12 years. 
Peru, Code of Military and Police Justice, 2006, Article 92.
This article is no longer in force. Along with certain other articles in this legislation, it was declared unconstitutional by the Constitutional Court (en banc decision for case file No. 0012-2006-PI-TC, 8 January 2007) because it does not stipulate a crime committed in the line of duty that would fall under the jurisdiction of a military court pursuant to Article 173 of Peru’s Constitution.
Peru’s Military and Police Criminal Code (2010) states:
A member of the military or the police shall be punished with deprivation of liberty of not less than three and not more than ten years if he or she, in a state of emergency and when the Armed Forces have assumed control over the internal order, injures a member of the adverse armed forces after he or she has unconditionally surrendered or has otherwise been placed hors de combat. 
Peru, Military and Police Criminal Code, 2010, Article 89.