Norma relacionada
Peru
Practice Relating to Rule 26. Medical Activities
Peru’s IHL Manual (2004) states:
Medical personnel providing medical services in armed conflicts have a duty to respect the principles of medical ethics as in peacetime. They must behave in the following way:
(1) practise their profession with conscience and dignity;
(2) make the health of the patient their first consideration. 
Peru, Manual de Derecho Internacional Humanitario para las Fuerzas Armadas, Resolución Ministerial Nº 1394-2004-DE/CCFFAA/CDIH-FFAA, Lima, 1 December 2004, § 84.a.(1) and (2).
The manual further states:
c. Medical personnel must not be punished for carrying out medical activities compatible with the principles of medical ethics.
This means that medical activities must not, under any circumstances, give rise to violence, threats, reprisals, prosecution or criminal or administrative punishment, if they are performed in keeping with the principles of medical ethics, regardless of the circumstances and the person benefiting from their assistance (no distinction must be made between friend and foe).
d. Medical personnel must not be compelled to act contrary to the rules of medical ethics.
Medical personnel must never be compelled to perform acts or to carry out work contrary to the rules of medical ethics, other medical rules designed for the benefit of the wounded and sick or the provisions of the Geneva Conventions and their Protocols. 
Peru, Manual de Derecho Internacional Humanitario para las Fuerzas Armadas, Resolución Ministerial Nº 1394-2004-DE/CCFFAA/CDIH-FFAA, Lima, 1 December 2004, § 93.c and d.
Peru’s IHL and Human Rights Manual (2010) states:
c. Medical personnel must not be punished or interrupted for carrying out medical activities compatible with the principles of medical ethics.
This means that medical activities must not, under any circumstances, give rise to violence, threats, prosecution or punishment (criminal or administrative sanctions), if they are performed in accordance with the principles of medical ethics, regardless of the circumstances and the person benefiting from their assistance (no distinction must be made between the wounded and sick based on whether they are friend or foe).
d. Medical personnel must not be compelled to act contrary to the rules of medical ethics.
Medical personnel must never be compelled to perform acts or to carry out acts or work incompatible with their humanitarian obligations and contrary to the principles of medical ethics or other medical … rules designed for the benefit of the wounded and sick or contrary to the provisions of the [1949 Geneva] Conventions and their [1977 Additional] Protocols. 
Peru, Manual de Derecho Internacional Humanitario y Derechos Humanos para las Fuerzas Armadas, Resolución Ministerial No. 049-2010/DE/VPD, Lima, 21 May 2010, § 84(c)–(d), p. 286.
The manual also states:
Medical personnel providing medical services in armed conflicts have a duty to respect the principles of medical ethics as in peacetime. They must behave in the following way:
(1) practise their profession with conscience and dignity;
(2) make the health of the patient their first consideration. 
Peru, Manual de Derecho Internacional Humanitario y Derechos Humanos para las Fuerzas Armadas, Resolución Ministerial No. 049-2010/DE/VPD, Lima, 21 May 2010, § 75(a)(1)–(2), p. 273.
Peru’s IHL Manual (2004) states:
Medical personnel providing medical services in armed conflicts have a duty to respect the principles of medical ethics as in peacetime. They must behave in the following way:
(3) respect the secrets confided in them. 
Peru, Manual de Derecho Internacional Humanitario para las Fuerzas Armadas, Resolución Ministerial Nº 1394-2004-DE/CCFFAA/CDIH-FFAA, Lima, 1 December 2004, § 84.a.(3).
The manual further states:
Medical personnel must not be compelled to give information concerning the wounded and sick in their care.
This refers to information that would, in their opinion, prove harmful to the patients concerned or to their families. This right implies a confidential relationship between patients and those treating them.
There are, however, exceptions to this rule. Regulations for the compulsory notification of communicable diseases must be respected, taking into account the general interest. 
Peru, Manual de Derecho Internacional Humanitario para las Fuerzas Armadas, Resolución Ministerial Nº 1394-2004-DE/CCFFAA/CDIH-FFAA, Lima, 1 December 2004, § 93.e.
Peru’s IHL and Human Rights Manual (2010) states:
Medical personnel must not be compelled to give information concerning the wounded and sick in their care.
This principle refers to information that would, in their opinion, prove harmful to the wounded and sick or to their families. This right implies a confidential relationship between patients and those tasked with treating them.
There are, however, exceptions to this rule. Regulations for the compulsory notification of communicable diseases must be respected, taking into account the general interest. 
Peru, Manual de Derecho Internacional Humanitario y Derechos Humanos para las Fuerzas Armadas, Resolución Ministerial No. 049-2010/DE/VPD, Lima, 21 May 2010, § 84(e), p. 286.
The manual also states:
Medical personnel providing medical services in armed conflicts have a duty to respect the principles of medical ethics as they would in peacetime. They must behave in the following way:
(3) Respect the secrets confided in them. 
Peru, Manual de Derecho Internacional Humanitario y Derechos Humanos para las Fuerzas Armadas, Resolución Ministerial No. 049-2010/DE/VPD, Lima, 21 May 2010, § 75(a)(3), p. 273.