Norma relacionada
Norway
Practice Relating to Rule 135. Children
Norway’s Military Penal Code (1902), as amended in 1981, provides:
Anyone who contravenes or is accessory to the contravention of provisions relating to the protection of persons or property laid down in … the Geneva Conventions of 12 August 1949 … [and in] the two additional protocols to these Conventions … is liable to imprisonment. 
Norway, Military Penal Code, 1902, as amended in 1981, § 108.
In 2008, in its fourth periodic report to the Committee on the Rights of the Child, Norway stated: “Protection of children in war and armed conflict and children’s participation in peacebuilding, peace and reconciliation are a prioritized area within Norwegian strategy for children and young persons in the south.” 
Norway, Fourth periodic report to the Committee on the Rights of the Child, 11 May 2009, UN Doc. CRC/C/NOR/4, submitted 28 February 2008, § 662.
In 2009, in a White Paper on “Climate, Conflict and Capital”, Norway’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs stated:
Despite the increased focus on children, serious violations of children’s rights are a major challenge for the international legal order. The contexts of conflicts have changed. Efforts to protect children must take into account new threats. …
The Government will … seek to ensure effective protection of children in armed conflicts and in connection with peacekeeping operations. 
Norway, Report to Parliament, White Paper on “Climate, Conflict and Capital”, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, 13 February 2009, § 5.4.
In 2010, in a statement before the UN Security Council on the protection of civilians in armed conflict, the counsellor of Norway’s Permanent Mission to the UN stated:
Norway welcomes the Security Council’s development of an increasingly strong protection framework for Children in Armed Conflict, most recently through its resolution 1882. …
Norway is encouraged by the Security Council’s expressed readiness, as set out in its most recent presidential statement on the issue, to impose targeted measures against persistent violators of international law who are recruiting, sexually abusing, or maiming and killing children in war. 
Norway, Statement before the UN Security Council by the Counsellor at the Permanent Mission of Norway to the UN on the “Protection of Civilians in Armed Conflict”, 7 July 2010.
Norway’s Military Penal Code (1902), as amended in 1981, provides:
Anyone who contravenes or is accessory to the contravention of provisions relating to the protection of persons or property laid down in … the Geneva Conventions of 12 August 1949 … [and in] the two additional protocols to these Conventions … is liable to imprisonment. 
Norway, Military Penal Code, 1902, as amended in 1981, § 108.
Norway’s Military Penal Code (1902), as amended in 1981, provides:
Anyone who contravenes or is accessory to the contravention of provisions relating to the protection of persons or property laid down in … the Geneva Conventions of 12 August 1949 … [and in] the two additional protocols to these Conventions … is liable to imprisonment. 
Norway, Military Penal Code, 1902, as amended in 1981, § 108.
Norway’s Military Penal Code (1902), as amended in 1981, provides:
Anyone who contravenes or is accessory to the contravention of provisions relating to the protection of persons or property laid down in … the Geneva Conventions of 12 August 1949 … [and in] the two additional protocols to these Conventions … is liable to imprisonment. 
Norway, Military Penal Code, 1902, as amended in 1981, § 108.
In 2009, in a White Paper on “Norway’s Humanitarian Policy”, Norway’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs stated: “The Government supports the efforts to reintegrate child soldiers into their families and local communities, and it makes active endeavours to strengthen the protection of children.” 
Norway, Report to Parliament, White Paper on “Norway’s Humanitarian Policy”, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, 29 May 2009, p. 18.