Norma relacionada
Italy
Practice Relating to Rule 69. Loss of Inviolability of Parlementaires
Italy’s IHL Manual (1991) provides that the parlementaire who continues to advance, or does not withdraw after having been ordered to do so, loses the status of inviolability after sufficient time to withdraw has been given. 
Italy, Manuale di diritto umanitario, Introduzione e Volume I, Usi e convenzioni di Guerra, SMD-G-014, Stato Maggiore della Difesa, I Reparto, Ufficio Addestramento e Regolamenti, Rome, 1991, Vol. I, § 54.
The manual further states that if “the parlementaire takes advantage of his privileged position to accomplish or attempt to accomplish acts of treason, he loses the right to inviolability and can be punished according to wartime penal law”. 
Italy, Manuale di diritto umanitario, Introduzione e Volume I, Usi e convenzioni di Guerra, SMD-G-014, Stato Maggiore della Difesa, I Reparto, Ufficio Addestramento e Regolamenti, Rome, 1991, Vol. I, § 58.
Italy’s Combatant’s Manual (1998) states that it is prohibited to “carry out any act of violence against Parlementaires and their escort, unless they carry out a hostile act first”. 
Italy, Manuale del Combattente, SME 1000/A/2, Stato Maggiore Esercito/Reparto Impiego delle Forze, Ufficio Dottrina, Addestramento e Regolamenti, 1998, § 247.
Italy’s Law of War Decree (1938), as amended in 1992, states that a parlementaire who continues to advance, or does not withdraw after having been ordered to do so, loses the status of inviolability after sufficient time to withdraw has been given. 
Italy, Law of War Decree, 1938, as amended in 1992, Article 70.
The Decree also states that a parlementaire who “takes advantage of his privileged position to commit acts of treason loses his right to inviolability”. 
Italy, Law of War Decree, 1938, as amended in 1992, Article 72.