Norma relacionada
Djibouti
Practice Relating to Rule 70. Weapons of a Nature to Cause Superfluous Injury or Unnecessary Suffering
Djibouti’s Manual on International Humanitarian Law (2004) states that IHL “has several principles [one of which is] … limitation: The rights of the parties [to an armed conflict] to choose the means and methods of combat are not unlimited (this means that tactics and weapons of a nature to cause unnecessary suffering are prohibited)”. 
Djibouti, Manuel sur le droit international humanitaire et les droits de l’homme applicables au travail du policier, Ministère de l’Intérieur, Direction Générale de la Police, 2004, p. 11.
In 2010, in the History and Geography Textbook for 8th Grade, Djibouti’s Ministry of National Education and Higher Education stated:
[T]he authors of the [1868] Saint Petersburg Declaration formulated, explicitly and implicitly, the principles of distinction, of military necessity and prohibition of superfluous injury and unnecessary suffering as follows:
That the only legitimate object which States should endeavour to accomplish during war is to weaken the military forces of the enemy;
That for this purpose it is sufficient to disable the greatest possible number of men;
That this object would be exceeded by the employment of arms which uselessly aggravate the sufferings of disabled men, or render their death inevitable. 
Djibouti, Ministry of National Education and Higher Education, History and Geography Textbook for 8th Grade, 2010, p. 188.
In 2011, in the History and Geography Textbook for 9th Grade, Djibouti’s Ministry of National Education and Vocational Training, under the heading “[O]ffences related to violations of humanitarian law”, listed “[e]mploying weapons, projectiles, means and methods of war that are of a nature to cause superfluous injury or unnecessary suffering”. 
Djibouti, Ministry of National Education and Vocational Training, History and Geography Textbook for 9th Grade, 2011, p. 210.