Norma relacionada
Djibouti
Practice Relating to Rule 161. International Cooperation in Criminal Proceedings
Djibouti’s Manual on International Humanitarian Law (2004) states:
Means of suppression
These are means which implement the obligation of parties to a conflict to prevent and stop any violation [of IHL]. Concerning mechanisms of suppression, the following are stressed in particular:
- judicial assistance between States in criminal matters. 
Djibouti, Manuel sur le droit international humanitaire et les droits de l’homme applicables au travail du policier, Ministère de l’Intérieur, Direction Générale de la Police, 2004, p. 14.
In 2010, in its initial report to the Committee against Torture, Djibouti stated:
86. The prohibition on extraditing a person to another State where he is in danger of being tortured can be deduced, by interpretation, from all the judicial cooperation agreements concluded by Djibouti with other States. …
87. … As a party to the [1984] Convention against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment, Djibouti may not extradite a person without taking all relevant facts into consideration, including, where appropriate, the existence in the requesting State of a consistent pattern of gross, flagrant or mass violations of human rights. This is a safety issue and a moral obligation.
88. … Djiboutian law prohibits the extradition of any individual to a State where he is in danger of being tortured. …
118. … [Extradition agreements] … include a formal prohibition on extraditing a person … for expressing certain views, on grounds of race, religion or nationality.
119. Thus, article 4 of the extradition agreement between Djibouti and France stipulates that extradition … may be refused if the requested State has serious reasons to believe that the extradition request was made in order to prosecute or punish a person on grounds of race, religion, nationality or political belief or that the person’s situation may be aggravated for one or other of these reasons. 
Djibouti, Initial report to the Committee against Torture, 18 January 2011, UN Doc. CAT/C/DJI/1, submitted 21 July 2010, §§ 86–88 and 118–119.
In 2010, in its initial report to the Committee against Torture, Djibouti stated: “Extradition treaties … provide for exceptional cases in which, for obvious reasons, States parties, following Djibouti’s example, do not extradite their respective nationals.” 
Djibouti, Initial report to the Committee against Torture, 18 January 2011, UN Doc. CAT/C/DJI/1, submitted 21 July 2010, § 86.
In 2010, in its initial report to the Committee against Torture, Djibouti stated:
118. … [Extradition agreements] … include a formal prohibition on extraditing a person for political or related offences …
119. Thus, article 4 of the extradition agreement between Djibouti and France stipulates that extradition shall not be granted when the offence in respect of which it is requested is considered by the requested State to be a political offence or an act connected with such an offence. 
Djibouti, Initial report to the Committee against Torture, 18 January 2011, UN Doc. CAT/C/DJI/1, submitted 21 July 2010, §§ 118–119.