Norma relacionada
China
Practice Relating to Rule 74. Chemical Weapons
China’s Law Governing the Trial of War Criminals (1946) provides that “use of poison gas” constitutes a war crime. 
China, Law Governing the Trial of War Criminals, 1946, Article 3(12).
At the Meeting on Human Environment in 1972, China condemned the United States for causing “unprecedented damage to the human environment” in South Vietnam through the use of “chemical toxic and poisonous gas”. 
China, Address to the Meeting on Human Environment, 10 June 1972, Selected Documents of the Chinese Delegation to the United Nations, 1972, World Knowledge Press, Beijing, pp. 257–258.
In 1986, during a debate in the UN Security Council, China stated that it “consistently opposed the use of chemical and toxic weapons at any place and time”. 
China, Statement before the UN Security Council, UN Doc. S/PV.2666, 24 February 1986, pp. 29–30.
In 1987, during a debate in the First Committee of the UN General Assembly, China stated that it had “consistently” stood for the complete prohibition of chemical weapons. 
China, Statement before the First Committee of the UN General Assembly, UN Doc. A/C.1/ 42/PV.6, 15 October 1987, p. 32.
In 1991, during a debate in the First Committee of the UN General Assembly, China stated that it neither possessed nor produced chemical weapons and that it had always stood for a complete prohibition of chemical weapons. 
China, Statement before the First Committee of the UN General Assembly, UN Doc. A/C.1/ 46/PV.9, 21 October 1991, pp. 15 and 19.
At the signing ceremony of the Chemical Weapons Convention in 1993, China’s Minister of Foreign Affairs stated: “China consistently supports the absolute ban and total destruction of chemical weapons.” 
China, Address to the signing ceremony of the Chemical Weapons Convention by the Chinese Foreign Minister, 13 January 1993, Chinese Yearbook of International Law, 1994, p. 375.
Before the adoption of the 1993 Chemical Weapons Convention, China unilaterally declared that it would not produce, possess or export chemical weapons. 
China, Statement of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the People’s Republic of China with regard to the Yinhe Incident, 4 September 1993, Chinese Yearbook of International Law, 1994, p. 397.
In 1997, at the First Conference of States Parties to the Chemical Weapons Convention, China stated that “it always advocated the complete prohibition and thorough destruction of chemical weapons”. 
China, Statement at the First Conference of States Parties to the Chemical Weapons Convention, The Hague, 6–23 May 1997.
In 2004, in a position paper submitted to the UN General Assembly, China stated:
China stands for complete prohibition and thorough destruction of all kinds of weapons of mass destruction (WMDs) including nuclear, biological and chemical weapons, and firmly opposes the proliferation of WMDs and their means of delivery.
China supports the purposes and objectives of the Chemical Weapons Convention and has been fulfilling its obligations under the Convention in a serious and strict manner. China calls upon those countries that have not signed or ratified the Convention to do so as soon as possible. The States Parties that possess chemical weapons and those that abandoned such weapons on the territories of other State Parties shall make further efforts to speed up the destruction process. 
China, Position Paper at the 59th Session of the UN General Assembly, 5 August 2004.
In 2004, in a white paper on “China’s National Defense in 2004”, China stated: “China continues to earnestly fulfil its obligations under the [1993 Chemical Weapons Convention].” 
China, White Paper of the Government of the People’s Republic of China: China’s National Defense in 2004, December 2004.
In 2005, in a position paper on UN reforms, China stated:
- China has always stood for the comprehensive prohibition and thorough destruction of weapons of mass destruction (WMD) and opposed any forms of proliferation of WMD and their delivery systems …
- China is in favor of strengthening the universality of the BTWC [Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention] and the Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC). 
China, Position Paper of the People’s Republic of China on the United Nations Reforms, 7 June 2005.
In 2005, in a white paper on “China’s Endeavours for Arms Control, Disarmament and Non-Proliferation”, China stated:
China stands for complete prohibition and thorough destruction of biological and chemical weapons and firmly opposes proliferation of such weapons.
China actively participated in the negotiations of the [1993 Chemical Weapons Convention] and had called strongly for addressing the issues of prohibiting the use of chemical weapons and the proper disposal of abandoned chemical weapons within the framework of the Convention, making it an international legal instrument truly for the complete ban of chemical weapons. 
China, White Paper of the Government of the People’s Republic of China: China’s Endeavours for Arms Control, Disarmament and Non-Proliferation, 1 September 2005.
In 2006, at the 11th session of the Conference of States Parties to the Chemical Weapons Convention, China stated:
China has always been committed to the object and purpose of the [1993 Chemical Weapons Convention], and honoured its obligations under the Convention … For the international community, the Convention carries with it an ideal of a world free of chemical weapons. 
China, Statement by the permanent representative of the People’s Republic of China to the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons at the 11th Session of the Conference of the States Parties, 5 December 2006.
In 2007, at the 12th session of the Conference of States Parties to the Chemical Weapons Convention, China stated:
China has all along supported the object and purpose of the [1993 Chemical Weapons Convention] and fulfilled earnestly its obligations under the Convention.
Early and complete elimination of all weapons of mass destruction, including chemical weapons, conforms to the common interest of all peoples. 
China, Statement by permanent representative of the People’s Republic of China to the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons at the 12th Session of the Conference of States Parties to the Chemical Weapons Convention, 5 November 2007.