Norma relacionada
Central African Republic
Practice Relating to Rule 139. Respect for International Humanitarian Law
The Central African Republic’s Instructor’s Manual (1999) states in Volume 1 (Basic and team leader instruction): “Even though killing the enemy is their duty, combatants are obliged at all times to respect, and ensure respect for, the laws and customs of war, also known as the law of war.” 
Central African Republic, Le Droit de la Guerre, Fascicule No. 1: Formation élémentaire toutes armés (FETA), formation commune de base (FCB), certificat d’aptitude technique No. 1 (Chef d’équipe), Ministère de la Défense, Forces Armées Centrafricaines, 1999, Preface.
The Central African Republic’s Interdepartmental Order on the Dissemination of IHL (2008) states:
Art. 1: A Committee for the Dissemination of International Humanitarian Law to the Defence and Security Forces is created.
Art. 2: The committee is responsible for the coordination and the efficiency of International Humanitarian Law activities within the Defence and Security Forces.
In this respect, it is responsible for:
- Defining the standard norms for the rules of engagement [and for the] structure of orders within the Defence and Security Forces during their respective missions;
- Creating International Humanitarian Law cells in the units and services of the Defence and Security Forces present in territorial communities;
- Ensuring the application of International Humanitarian Law at the strategic, tactical and operational levels during the conduct of operations. 
Central African Republic, Interdepartmental Order on the Dissemination of IHL, 2008, Articles 1–2.
The Central African Republic’s Instructor’s Manual (1999) states in Volume 2 (Instruction for group and patrol leaders):
INTRODUCTION
Each military commander is responsible for respect for the law of war within his sphere of command. Within his unit, he is in particular responsible for the instruction of the law of war in order to induce his troops to adopt a behaviour in conformity with the law and above all vis-à-vis specifically protected persons and objects.
I. GENERAL RESPONSIBILITY IN MILITARY OPERATIONS
As a rule, the commander of the forces carrying out a military operation is responsible for ensuring respect for the law of war. This responsibility extends to the civilian domain to the extent required by the law of war, in particular regarding cooperation with the civilian authorities. 
Central African Republic, Le Droit de la Guerre, Fascicule No. 2: Formation pour l’obtention du certificat technique No. 2 (Chef de Groupe), du certificat Inter-Armé (CIA), du certificat d’aptitude de Chef de Patrouille (CACP), Ministère de la Défense, Forces Armées Centrafricaines, 1999, Chapter IV, Introduction and Section I; see also Chapter IV, Conclusion.
In Volume 3 (Instruction for non-commissioned officers studying for the level 1 and 2 certificates and for future officers of the criminal police), the manual states:
Controlling execution is the final step in the command process. The aim is to ensure that the orders given to subordinates are executed as intended by the commander.
Control helps strengthen order and discipline. It enables the military commander to intervene and, if necessary, to correct the way an action is carried out or to take any appropriate measures.
Control allows the military commander to ensure that his subordinates respect and ensure respect for the law of war in their sphere of responsibility. 
Central African Republic, Le Droit de la Guerre, Fascicule No. 3: Formation pour l’obtention du Brevet d’Armes No. 1, du Brevet d’Armes No. 2 et le stage d’Officier de Police Judiciaire (OPJ), Ministère de la Défense, Forces Armées Centrafricaines, 1999, Chapter II, Section IV; see also Chapter II, Section I.