Norma relacionada
Australia
Practice Relating to Rule 29. Medical Transports
Section B. Respect for and protection of medical aircraft
Australia’s Defence Force Manual (1994) states:
972. … Medical aircraft must be respected and protected at all times and must not be attacked. Their immunity ceases once they are used for purposes hostile to the adverse party and outside their humanitarian purpose.
977. Medical aircraft may fly over land physically controlled by their own or friendly forces, and over sea areas not under enemy control. However, it is advisable that the enemy be informed if such flights are likely to bring the aircraft within range of enemy surface-to-air weapon systems.
978. In accordance with LOAC, flight of such aircraft over enemy or enemy-occupied territory is forbidden without prior agreement. In the absence of such agreement, medical aircraft operating in parts of the zone controlled by friendly forces, and over areas the control of which is doubtful, do so at their own risk, but once they are recognised as medical aircraft they must be respected.
979. Provided prior agreement has been obtained from the enemy, medical aircraft belonging to a combatant remain protected while flying over land or sea areas under the physical control of the enemy. If it deviates for any reason from the terms of such an agreement, the aircraft shall take immediate steps to identify itself. Upon being recognised as a medical aircraft, the adverse party may order it to land, or take such other steps to safeguard its own interests, and must allow time for compliance before attacking the aircraft.
980. Known medical aircraft are entitled to protection while performing medical functions … Medical aircraft must not be used in order to gain any military advantage and while carrying out flights in accordance with the two preceding paragraphs, shall not, without prior agreement, be used to search for the wounded, sick and shipwrecked. 
Australia, Manual on Law of Armed Conflict, Australian Defence Force Publication, Operations Series, ADFP 37 – Interim Edition, 1994, §§ 972 and 977–980.
Australia’s LOAC Manual (2006) states:
Medical aircraft, that is, aircraft exclusively employed for the removal of wounded and sick for the transport of medical personnel and equipment, shall not be attacked, but shall be respected by the belligerents, while flying at heights, at times and on routes specifically agreed upon between the belligerents concerned. These aircraft should bear clearly marked, distinctive emblems, together with their national colours on their upper and lower surfaces. 
Australia, The Manual of the Law of Armed Conflict, Australian Defence Doctrine Publication 06.4, Australian Defence Headquarters, 11 May 2006, § 5.44.
In its chapter on “Protected Persons and Objects”, the manual states:
9.78 Medical … aircraft must be respected and protected at all times and must not be attacked. Their immunity ceases once they are used for purposes hostile to the adverse party and outside their humanitarian purpose.
9.83 Medical aircraft may fly over land physically controlled by their own or friendly forces, and over sea areas not under enemy control. However, it is advisable that the enemy be informed if such flights are likely to bring the aircraft within range of enemy surface-to-air weapon systems.
9.84 In accordance with the LOAC, flight of such aircraft over enemy or enemy-occupied territory is forbidden without prior agreement. In the absence of such agreement, medical aircraft operating in parts of the zone controlled by friendly forces, and over areas the control of which is doubtful, do so at their own risk, but once they are recognised as medical aircraft they must be respected.
9.85 Provided prior agreement has been obtained from the enemy, medical aircraft belonging to a combatant remain protected while flying over land or sea areas under the physical control of the enemy. If it deviates for any reason from the terms of such an agreement, the aircraft shall take immediate steps to identify itself. Upon being recognised as a medical aircraft, the adverse party may order it to land, or take such other steps to safeguard its own interests, and must allow time for compliance before attacking the aircraft.
9.86 Known medical aircraft are entitled to protection when performing medical functions … Medical aircraft must not be used in order to gain any military advantage and while carrying out flights in accordance with the two preceding paragraphs, shall not, without prior agreement, be used to search for the wounded, sick and shipwrecked. 
Australia, The Manual of the Law of Armed Conflict, Australian Defence Doctrine Publication 06.4, Australian Defence Headquarters, 11 May 2006, §§ 9.78 and 9.83–9.86; see also §§ 8.49 and 8.60–8.63.
The manual further states: “Among other war crimes generally recognised as forming part of the customary LOAC are … attacking a properly marked … medical aircraft”. 
Australia, The Manual of the Law of Armed Conflict, Australian Defence Doctrine Publication 06.4, Australian Defence Headquarters, 11 May 2006, § 13.30.
The LOAC Manual (2006) replaces both the Defence Force Manual (1994) and the Commanders’ Guide (1994).