Norma relacionada
Australia
Practice Relating to Rule 29. Medical Transports
Section A. Respect for and protection of medical transports
Australia’s Commanders’ Guide (1994) provides: “civilian medical … transports and supplies are not to be made the target of attack or unnecessarily destroyed. Military medical … facilities and equipment are also entitled to general protection under the Geneva Conventions.” 
Australia, Law of Armed Conflict, Commanders’ Guide, Australian Defence Force Publication, Operations Series, ADFP 37 Supplement 1 – Interim Edition, 7 March 1994, §§ 614–615.
Australia’s Defence Force Manual (1994) provides: “civilian medical … transports and supplies are not to be made the target of attack or unnecessarily destroyed.” 
Australia, Manual on Law of Armed Conflict, Australian Defence Force Publication, Operations Series, ADFP 37 – Interim Edition, 1994, § 963; see also § 902.
The manual defines medical transports as “any means of transportation, whether military or civilian, permanent or temporary, assigned exclusively to medical transportation and under the control of a competent authority of a party to the conflict”. 
Australia, Manual on Law of Armed Conflict, Australian Defence Force Publication, Operations Series, ADFP 37 – Interim Edition, 1994, Glossary.
Australia’s LOAC Manual (2006) states:
5.41 Medical units, materials and means of transportation are protected. This applies to any form of medical transportation, whether by sea, land or air …
5.43 Transports of wounded and sick or of medical equipment shall be respected and protected in the same way as mobile medical units. Should such transports or vehicles fall into the hands of the adverse party, they shall be subject to the laws of war, on condition that the party to the conflict who captures them shall in all cases ensure the care of the wounded and sick they contain.
9.68 … [C]ivilian medical … transports and supplies are not to be made the target of attack or unnecessarily destroyed.
9.79 Medical … transports are any means of transportation, military or civilian, permanent or temporary, assigned exclusively to medical transportation and under control of a competent authority of a party to the conflict. 
Australia, The Manual of the Law of Armed Conflict, Australian Defence Doctrine Publication 06.4, Australian Defence Headquarters, 11 May 2006, §§ 5.41, 5.43, 9.68 and 9.79.
The LOAC Manual (2006) replaces both the Defence Force Manual (1994) and the Commanders’ Guide (1994).
Australia’s Criminal Code Act (1995), as amended to 2007, states with respect to other serious war crimes that are committed in the course of an international armed conflict:
268.66 War crimeattacking persons or objects using the distinctive emblems of the Geneva Conventions
(2) A person (the perpetrator) commits an offence if:
(a) the perpetrator attacks one or more buildings, medical units or transports or other objects; and
(b) the buildings, units or transports or other objects are using, in conformity with the Geneva Conventions or the Protocols to the Geneva Conventions, any of the distinctive emblems of the Geneva Conventions; and
(c) the perpetrator intends the buildings, units or transports or other objects so using such an emblem to be the object of the attack; and
(d) the perpetrator’s conduct takes place in the context of, and is associated with, an international armed conflict.
Penalty: Imprisonment for 20 years.
(3) Strict liability applies to paragraphs … (2)(b). 
Australia, Criminal Code Act, 1995, as amended to 2007, Chapter 8, § 268.66, p. 345.
The Act further states with respect to war crimes that are other serious violations of the laws and customs applicable in a non-international armed conflict:
268.78 War crimeattacking persons or objects using the distinctive emblems of the Geneva Conventions
(2) A person (the perpetrator) commits an offence if:
(a) the perpetrator attacks one or more buildings, medical units or transports or other objects; and
(b) the buildings, units or transports or other objects are using, in conformity with the Geneva Conventions or the Protocols to the Geneva Conventions, any of the distinctive emblems of the Geneva Conventions; and
(c) the perpetrator intends the buildings, units or transports or other objects so using such an emblem to be the object of the attack; and
(d) the perpetrator’s conduct takes place in the context of, and is associated with, an armed conflict that is not an international armed conflict.
Penalty: Imprisonment for 20 years.
(3) Strict liability applies to paragraphs (1)(b) and (2)(b). 
Australia, Criminal Code Act, 1995, as amended to 2007, Chapter 8, § 268.78, p. 355.