Norma relacionada
Yugoslavia, Socialist Federal Republic of
Practice Related to Rule 95. Forced Labour
Section B. Compelling persons to serve in the forces of a hostile power
The Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia’s Criminal Offences against the Nation and State Act (1945) considers that, during war or enemy occupation, “any person who ordered, assisted or otherwise was the direct executor of … compulsory mobilization” committed a war crime. 
Yugoslavia, Socialist Federal Republic of, Criminal Offences against the Nation and State Act, 1945, Article 3(3).
The Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia’s Penal Code (1976), as amended in 2001, provides that compelling civilians and prisoners of war to serve in the forces of a hostile power or administration is a war crime. 
Yugoslavia, Socialist Federal Republic of, Penal Code, 1976, as amended in 2001, Articles 142(1) and 144.
In 1991, in a document entitled “Examples of violations of the rules of international law committed by the so-called armed forces of Slovenia”, the Ministry of Defence of the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia included the following: “The YPA [Yugoslav People’s Army] are arrested, while in their identity booklets they state that the military service is completed, and then are forcefully mobilized into Slovenian forces.” 
Yugoslavia, Socialist Federal Republic of, Ministry of Defence, Examples of violations of the rules of international law committed by the so-called armed forces of Slovenia, 10 July 1991, § 3(ii).