Соответствующая норма
South Africa
Practice Relating to Rule 108. Mercenaries
Section A. Definition of mercenaries
South Africa’s LOAC Teaching Manual (2008) states:
Mercenaries ([1977] Additional Protocol I Article 47)
- Is specially recruited locally or abroad in order to fight in an armed conflict;
- Does, in fact, take part in hostilities;
- Is motivated to take part in hostilities essentially by the desire for private gain and, in fact, is promised by or on behalf of a Party to the conflict, material compensation substantially in excess of that promised or paid to combatants of similar ranks and functions in the armed forces of that Party;
- Is neither a national of a Party to the conflict nor a resident of territory controlled by a Party to the conflict;
- Is not a member of the armed forces of a Party to the conflict; and
- Has not been sent by a State that is not a Party to the conflict on official duty as a member of its armed forces. 
South Africa, Advanced Law of Armed Conflict Teaching Manual, School of Military Justice, 1 April 2008, as amended to 25 October 2013, Learning Unit 1, pp. 38–39.
South Africa’s Prohibition of Mercenary Activities and Regulation of Certain Activities in Country of Armed Conflict Act (2006) states:
Definitions and interpretation
armed conflict” includes any –
(a) situation in a regulated country proclaimed as such in terms of section 6;
and
(b) armed conflict in any other country which has not been so proclaimed, between –
(i) the armed forces of such country and dissident or rebel armed forces or other armed groups;
(ii) the armed forces of any states;
(iii) armed groups;
(iv) armed forces of any occupying power and dissident or rebel armed forces or any other armed group; or
(v) any other combination of the entities referred to in subparagraphs (i) to (iv);
“assistance or service” includes –
(a) any form of military or military-related assistance, service or activity;
(b) any form of assistance or service to a party to an armed conflict by means of –
(i) advice or training;
(ii) personnel, financial, logistical, intelligence or operational support;
(iii) personnel recruitment;
(iv) medical or para-medical services; or
(v) procurement of equipment; or
(c) security services;
Committee” means the National Conventional Arms Control Committee, established in terms of section 2 of the National Conventional Arms Control Act, 2002 (Act No. 41 of 2002);
(a) in accordance with the principles of international law, especially international humanitarian law, including the purposes and principles of the Charter of the United Nations and the Declaration on Principles of International Law concerning Friendly Relations and Cooperation among States; or
(b) performed by the security services, as contemplated in section 199 of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996, either in fulfillment of international obligations or in terms of any other law.
Prohibition of mercenary activity
(a) participate as a combatant for private gain in an armed conflict;
(b) directly or indirectly recruit, use, train, support or finance a combatant for private gain in an armed conflict;
(c) directly or indirectly participate in any manner in the initiation, causing or furthering of –
(i) an armed conflict; or
(ii) a coup d’état, uprising or rebellion against any government; or
(d) directly or indirectly perform any act aimed at overthrowing a government or undermining the constitutional order, sovereignty or territorial integrity of a state.
Prohibition and regulation of certain assistance or rendering of services in country of armed conflict or regulated country
(a) negotiate or offer to provide any assistance or render any service to a party to an armed conflict or in a regulated country, unless such a person has been granted authorisation in terms of section 7 to negotiate or offer such assistance or service;
(b) provide any assistance or render any service to a party to an armed conflict or in a regulated country, unless such assistance is provided or such service is rendered in accordance with an agreement or arrangement authorised in terms of section 7;
(c) recruit, use, train, support or finance any person to provide assistance or render any service to a party to an armed conflict or in a regulated country, unless such person has been authorised in terms of section 7 to recruit, use, train, support or finance such a person;
(d) recruit, use, train, support or finance any person to provide assistance or render a service to a party to an armed conflict or in a regulated country unless such a person is recruited, used, trained, supported or financed in accordance with an agreement or arrangement authorised in terms of section 7; or
(e) perform any other act that has the result of furthering the military interests of a party to an armed conflict or in a regulated country, unless such a person has been authorised in terms of section 7.
Prohibition and regulation of enlistment of South Africans in armed forces
Proclamation of regulated country
(a) an armed conflict exists or is imminent in any country; and
(b) such a country should be proclaimed to be a regulated country.
Application for authorisation
(a) refuse the application;
(b) grant the application subject to such conditions as it may determine; or
(c) at any time withdraw or amend an authorisation so granted.
Criteria for authorisation or exemption
(a) is in conflict with the Republic’s obligations in terms of international law;
(b) would result in the infringement of human rights and fundamental freedoms in the territory where the assistance or service is to be rendered or the exemption granted;
(c) endangers the peace by introducing destabilising military capabilities into the region or territory where the assistance or service, or humanitarian aid, is or is likely to be, provided or rendered;
(d) would contribute to regional instability or negatively influence the balance of power in such region or territory;
(e) in any manner supports or encourages any terrorist activity or terrorist and related activities, as defined in section 1 of the Protection of Constitutional Democracy against Terrorist and Related Activities Act, 2004 (Act No. 33 of 2004);
(f) contributes to the escalation of regional conflicts;
(g) in any manner initiates, causes or furthers an armed conflict, or a coup d’état, uprising or rebellion against a government; or
(h) prejudices the Republic’s national or international interests. 
South Africa, Prohibition of Mercenary Activities and Regulation of Certain Activities in Country of Armed Conflict Act, 2006, Sections 1–4, 6(1), 7(1)–(2) and 9.
In 1987, in the Petane case, the Cape Provincial Division of South Africa’s Supreme Court dismissed the accused’s claim that the 1977 Additional Protocol I reflected customary international law. The Court stated:
… The point in its early formulation was this. By the terms of [the 1977 Additional] Protocol I to the [1949] Geneva Conventions the accused was entitled to be treated as a prisoner-of-war. A prisoner-of-war is entitled to have notice of an impending prosecution for an alleged offence given to the so-called “protecting power” appointed to watch over prisoners-of-war. Since, if such a notice were necessary, the trial could not proceed without it, Mr Donen suggested that the necessity or otherwise for giving such a notice should be determined before evidence was led. …
Mr Donen contended that the provisions of multilateral treaties can become customary international law under certain circumstances. I accept that this is so. There seems in principle to be no reason why treaty rules cannot acquire wider application than among the parties to the treaty.
Brownlie Principles of International Law 3rd ed at 13 agrees that non-parties to a treaty may by their conduct accept the provisions of a multilateral convention as representing general international law. …
According to the International Review of the Red Cross (January/February 1987) No 256, as at December 1986, 66 States were parties to Protocol I and 60 to Protocol II, which, it will be remembered, deals with internal non-international armed conflicts. With the exception of France, which acceded only to Protocol II, not one of the world’s major powers has acceded to or ratified either of the Protocols. This position should be compared to the 165 States which are parties to the Geneva Conventions.
This approach of the world community to Protocol I is, on principle, far too half-hearted to justify an inference that its principles have been so widely accepted as to qualify them as rules of customary international law. The reasons for this are, I imagine, not far to seek. For those States which are contending with “peoples[’]” struggles for self-determination, adoption of the Protocol may prove awkward. For liberation movements who rely on strategies of urban terror for achieving their aims the terms of the Protocol, with its emphasis on the protection of civilians, may prove disastrously restrictive. I therefore do not find it altogether surprising that Mr Donen was unable to refer me to any statement in the published literature that Protocol I has attained the status o[f] customary international [law].
I have not been persuaded by the arguments which I have heard on behalf of the accused that the assessment of Professor Dugard, writing in the Annual Survey of South African Law (1983) at 66, that “it is argued with growing conviction that under contemporary international law members of SWAPO [South-West Africa People’s Organisation] and the ANC [African National Congress] are members of liberation movements entitled to prisoner-of-war status, in terms of a new customary rule spawned by the 1977 Protocols”, is correct. On what I have heard in argument I disagree with his assessment that there is growing support for the view that the Protocols reflect a new rule of customary international law. No writer has been cited who supports this proposition. Here and there someone says that it may one day come about. I am not sure that the provisions relating to the field of application of Protocol I are capable of ever becoming a rule of customary international law, but I need not decide that point today.
In 2010, in the Boeremag case, South Africa’s North Gauteng High Court stated:
In Petane, … Conradie J found that the provisions of [the 1977 Additional] Protocol I are not part of customary international law, and therefore are also not part of South African law.
Referring to the fact that in December 1986 only 66 of the 165 States party to the Geneva Conventions had ratified Protocol I, the Court [in Petane] stated:
This approach of the world community to Protocol I is, on principle, far too half-hearted to justify an inference that its principles have been so widely accepted as to qualify them as rules of customary international law. The reasons for this are, I imagine, not far to seek. For those States which are contending with “peoples[’]” struggles for self-determination, adoption of the Protocol may prove awkward. For liberation movements who rely on strategies of urban terror for achieving their aims the terms of the Protocol, with its emphasis on the protection of civilians, may prove disastrously restrictive. I therefore do not find it altogether surprising that Mr Donen was unable to refer me to any statement in the published literature that Protocol I has attained the status of customary international law.
Important changes with respect to certain aspects applicable at the time of Petane have taken place. The ANC [African National Congress] has become South Africa’s ruling party and in 1995 ratified Protocol I. The total number of States that have ratified it, is now … 162.
The consensus of both parties to the conflict is required. See Petane … and Article 96 of Protocol I. …
Parliament’s failure to incorporate Protocol I into legislation in accordance with Article 231(4) of the Constitution in fact points to the contrary, and is indicative that the requirements of usus and/or opinio juris have not been met. See Petane. 
South Africa, North Gauteng High Court, Boeremag case, Judgment, 26 August 2010, pp. 21–22.
[footnotes in original omitted]
The Court also held:
If the [1977 Additional Protocol I] applies in South Africa as customary international law, the two requirements that form the basis of customary law must be met. It is arguable that the requirement of usus has been met by the vast number of States that have acceded or ratified it. By ratifying Protocol I the Republic of South Africa has indicated its intention to apply the Protocol, thereby fulfilling the requirement of opinio juris. 
South Africa, North Gauteng High Court, Boeremag case, Judgment, 26 August 2010, p. 66.