Соответствующая норма
Colombia
Practice Relating to Rule 98. Enforced Disappearance
Section B. Preventive measures
In 2005, in the Constitutional Case No. C-473/05, the Plenary Chamber of Colombia’s Constitutional Court stated:
The objective of the urgent tracing mechanism is for judicial authorities to immediately exercise every diligence for the purpose of finding out the location of those presumed missing. Therefore, … the urgent tracing mechanism has a preventive goal regarding the commission of the crime of enforced disappearance. 
Colombia, Constitutional Court, Constitutional Case No. C-473/05, Judgment of 10 May 2005, § 33.
In 2008, in its Comprehensive Human Rights and IHL Policy, the Ministry of National Defence of Colombia stated: “In order to prevent forced disappearance … , the Ministry of Defence has … issued … orders pursuant to Directive No. 6 of 2006”. 
Colombia, Ministry of National Defence, Comprehensive Human Rights and IHL Policy, January 2008, § 140.
In 2008, in its sixth periodic report to the Human Rights Committee, Colombia stated:
182. Law No. 971 of 2005 [Law on the Urgent Tracing Mechanism] governs the urgent search mechanism, which is a public oversight strategy to protect freedom, personal integrity and other rights and guarantees of persons believed to have been subjected to enforced disappearance. The aim is that the judicial authorities carry out immediately all necessary steps aimed at locating such persons, as an effective mechanism to prevent the commission of the crime of enforced disappearance …
257. Security forces and human rights. The action of organized illegal armed groups in Colombia has demanded of the authorities the highest standards of efficiency and legitimacy. The security forces are facing criminals who will stop at nothing and who constantly disregard the principles of international humanitarian law at the expense of the civilian population.
258. In this context, the national Government, through the Ministry of National Defence, is making enormous efforts to ensure that members of the security forces are trained and adhere strictly to the principles of legality, protection, necessity and proportionality when confronting criminals. The international law of human rights and international humanitarian law have been incorporated into the training programmes and doctrine of the armed forces and National Police. …
259. In Colombia there is an institutional policy of zero tolerance against violations of human rights …
260. In that vein, the Ministry of Defence has issued the following directives:
b) Standing Ministerial Directive No. 6 of 2006, which aims to take measures to prevent the enforced disappearance of persons. 
Colombia, Sixth periodic report to the Human Rights Committee, 2 June 2009, UN Doc. CCPR/C/COL/6, submitted 10 December 2008, §§ 182 and 257–260.
In 2009, Colombia’s National Council for Social and Economic Policy approved a policy on the Consolidation of Mechanisms for the Tracing and Identification of Disappeared Persons in Colombia. The Policy states:
Colombia has made significant progress in the implementation and development of strategies that contribute to the prevention of enforced disappearance, such as Permanent Directive No. 6 of 2006 of the Ministry of National Defence. This document adopts measures to prevent enforced disappearance, to support the judicial authorities in the investigation of this crime and to search for disappeared persons …
Effective mechanisms for the search for and identification of the disappeared, together with prevention strategies, truth-telling, the punishment of the perpetrators and full reparation … , constitute the minimum mandatory response to the victims (direct victims and their families) and society. 
Colombia, National Planning Department, National Council for Social and Economic Policy, Consolidation of Mechanisms for the Tracing and Identification of Disappeared Persons in Colombia, CONPES Document No. 3590, 1 June 2009, pp. 1–2.
The Policy also states:
The disappearance of a family member, and thus not knowing their fate or whereabouts, has psychological, economic, social and legal consequences that extend even to whole communities and affect their ability to face the past and take part in a lasting peace and reconciliation process. These disappearances are usually associated with violations of human rights and international humanitarian law[.] 
Colombia, National Planning Department, National Council for Social and Economic Policy, Consolidation of Mechanisms for the Tracing and Identification of Disappeared Persons in Colombia, CONPES Document No. 3590, 1 June 2009, pp. 33–34.