Соответствующая норма
Zimbabwe
Practice Relating to Rule 71. Weapons That Are by Nature Indiscriminate
In its oral pleadings before the ICJ in the Nuclear Weapons case in 1995, Zimbabwe stated:
Nuclear weapons create a vastly greater threat than any other weapon because of their indiscriminate nature. The radiation from nuclear weapons knows no boundaries … The threat or use of nuclear weapons violates the principles of humanitarian law prohibiting the use of weapons or methods of warfare that … are indiscriminate … Zimbabwe would like to emphasize that radiation from nuclear weapons cannot be contained either in space or in time. 
Zimbabwe, Oral pleadings before the ICJ, Nuclear Weapons case, 15 November 1995, Verbatim Record CR 95/35, pp. 25–28.
In 2014, in a speech on the occasion of a workshop on the Biological and Toxin Weapons Crimes Bill, the Director of Procurement, Research and Administration in Zimbabwe’s Ministry of Defence stated:
As some of you may be aware, the Biological and Toxin Weapons Bill falls into the category of [c]hemical disarm[a]ment legislation that seeks to criminalise and prohibit the use of harmful chemicals and toxins in warfare. The bill seeks to protect the society from the indiscriminate effects of biological and toxin weapons in the event of armed conflict. You are aware, ladies and gentlemen[,] that once these biological and toxin weapons are unleashed, they don’t discriminate between a combatant and an innocent civilian and this is undesirable. It is our duty as Government to protect our people and as such we do not want our people to become victims of such atrocious substances. 
Zimbabwe, Speech by the Director of Procurement, Research and Administration in the Ministry of Defence on the occasion of the Workshop on the Biological and Toxin Weapons Crimes Bill, 24 November 2014, p. 3.