Соответствующая норма
Venezuela
Practice Relating to Rule 143. Dissemination of International Humanitarian Law among the Civilian Population
In 2001, in the Ballestas case, the Colombian Government requested the preventive detention and extradition of a Colombian citizen belonging to the armed group known as the Ejército de Liberación Nacional (National Liberation Army) for the crimes of rebellion, kidnapping, wrongful death, seizure and diversion of aircraft. The Chamber of Criminal Appeals of Venezuela’s Supreme Tribunal of Justice stated:
The High Contracting Parties have the legal obligation of disseminating as widely as possible … [the 1949 Geneva] Conventions and their [1977] Additional Protocols. … In these situations [of non-conventional, informal or “unstructured” armed conflicts], greater efforts must be made to disseminate International Humanitarian Law. 
Venezuela, Supreme Tribunal of Justice, Ballestas case, Judgment, 10 December 2001, pp. 8–9.
In 2011, in its initial report to the Committee on the Rights of the Child under the Optional Protocol on the Involvement of Children in Armed Conflict, Venezuela stated:
75. The Directorate of Human Rights and International Humanitarian Law of the Ministry of Defence is charged with disseminating the provisions of the human rights treaties that have been signed by the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela. Accordingly, a number of activities have been carried out for the purpose of publicizing the content of the [2000] Optional Protocol [on the Involvement of Children in Armed Conflict].
106. To fulfil its obligation to disseminate the Optional Protocol, the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela created the Autonomous Institute and National Council on the Rights of Children and Adolescents as part of the National System for the Comprehensive Protection of Children and Adolescents. The Institute is responsible for advocating and raising awareness about the rights, guarantees and duties of children and adolescents, as well as representing their interests and concerns before the other agencies and stakeholders in the system.
108. The Venezuelan State, acting through the Ministry of Defence, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and its Office of the State Representative for Human Rights and the Ministry of Communes and Social Protection and its subsidiary agency, the Autonomous Institute and National Council on the Rights of Children and Adolescents, reiterates its commitment to disseminating the Optional Protocol among the general public and the country’s military and police forces.
109. Specifically, in order to raise awareness regarding the rights of children and adolescents, prevent the use of children and adolescents in armed hostilities and conflicts and fulfil the mandate set forth in the Optional Protocol, the Office of the State Representative for Human Rights of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs has implemented mechanisms for disseminating the Optional Protocol among government institutions, encouraging them to effectively inform the public about the principles set forth in this international instrument and raise awareness about the Optional Protocol. 
Venezuela, Initial report to the Committee on the Rights of the Child under the Optional Protocol on the Involvement of Children in Armed Conflict, 12 September 2013, UN Doc. CRC/C/OPAC/VEN/1, submitted 5 July 2011, §§ 75, 106 and 108–109.