Соответствующая норма
United States of America
Practice Relating to Rule 25. Medical Personnel
Section B. Equipment of medical personnel with light individual weapons
The US Field Manual (1956) states:
Although medical personnel may carry arms for self-defense, they may not employ such arms against enemy forces acting in conformity with the law of war. These arms are for their personal defense and for the protection of the wounded and sick under their charge against marauders and other persons violating the law of war. 
United States, Field Manual 27-10, The Law of Land Warfare, US Department of the Army, 18 July 1956, as modified by Change No. 1, 15 July 1976, § 223(b).
The US Air Force Commander’s Handbook (1980) states: “Medical personnel are permitted to carry arms solely to protect themselves and their patients against unlawful attack.” 
United States, Air Force Pamphlet 110-34, Commander’s Handbook on the Law of Armed Conflict, Judge Advocate General, US Department of the Air Force, 25 July 1980, § 3-2(d).
The US Naval Handbook (1995) states:
Possession of small arms for self-protection, for the protection of the wounded and sick, and for protection from marauders and others violating the law of armed conflict does not disqualify medical personnel from protected status. Medical personnel may not use such arms against enemy forces acting in conformity with the law of armed conflict. 
United States, The Commander’s Handbook on the Law of Naval Operations, NWP 1-14M/MCWP 5-2.1/COMDTPUB P5800.7, issued by the Department of the Navy, Office of the Chief of Naval Operations and Headquarters, US Marine Corps, and Department of Transportation, US Coast Guard, October 1995 (formerly NWP 9 (Rev. A)/FMFM 1-10, October 1989), § 11.5.
The Annotated Supplement to the US Naval Handbook (1997) notes that “there was no agreement at the [CDDH] as to what “light individual weapons” for self-defence and for the defence of patients meant, although a number of military experts agreed with the British proposal (see infra). 
United States, Annotated Supplement to the Commander’s Handbook on the Law of Naval Operations, prepared by the Oceans Law and Policy Department, Center for Naval Warfare Studies, Naval War College, Newport, Rhode Island, November 1997, § 11.5, footnote 32.
The US Naval Handbook (2007) states:
Medical personnel may possess small arms for self-protection or for the protection of the wounded and sick in their care against marauders and others violating the law of armed conflict. Medical personnel may not use such arms against enemy forces acting in conformity with the law of armed conflict. 
United States, The Commander’s Handbook on the Law of Naval Operations, NWP 1-14M/MCWP 5-12.1/COMDTPUB P5800.7, issued by the Department of the Navy, Office of the Chief of Naval Operations and Headquarters, US Marine Corps, and Department of Homeland Security, US Coast Guard, July 2007, § 8.2.4.1.
At the CDDH, the United States “agreed that the carrying of arms by civilian medical personnel … should not be considered as harmful, but in occupied territories or in areas in which fighting was taking place, the right of the party in control of the area to disarm such personnel should be reserved”. 
United States, Statement at the CDDH, Official Records, Vol. XI, CDDH/SR.14, 7 March 1974, p. 128, § 66.
According to the Report on US Practice, it is the opinio juris of the United States that
[medical] personnel and medical vehicles may be armed, but in international armed conflicts, they may use their weapons only in self-defence and in defence of their patients against marauders and against those enemy forces that do not respect their protected status. 
Report on US Practice, 1997, Chapter 2.7.