Соответствующая норма
Uganda
Practice Relating to Rule 89. Violence to Life
Uganda’s Code of Conduct (1986) provides: “Never kill any member of the public or any captured prisoners, as the guns should only be reserved for armed enemies or opponents.” 
Uganda, Code of Conduct for the National Resistance Army (NRA), Legal Notice No. 1 of 1986 (Amendment), 23 August 1986, Rule 4.
Uganda’s Operational Code of Conduct (1986) states: “The offence of disobeying lawful orders shall include … unauthorised killing of prisoners of war”. 
Uganda, Operational Code of Conduct for the National Resistance Army (NRA), Legal Notice No. 1 of 1986 (Amendment), 23 August 1986, Rule 17(i).
The manual also states: “The following crimes shall cause an immediate arrest of an officer by any soldier … murder”. 
Uganda, Operational Code of Conduct for the National Resistance Army (NRA), Legal Notice No. 1 of 1986 (Amendment), 23 August 1986, Rule 26(a).
Uganda’s Geneva Conventions Act (1964) punishes “any person, whatever his nationality, who, whether within or without Uganda, commits or aids, abets or procures the commission by any other person of any grave breach of the [1949 Geneva] Conventions”. 
Uganda, Geneva Conventions Act, 1964, Section 1(1).
In the Kotido Field Court Martial case in 2008, which related to a Field Court Martial held in 2002 that had, within the space of three hours, resulted in the indictment, conviction and then execution of two soldiers for the crime of murder, Uganda’s Constitutional Court unanimously ruled that accused persons in Field Court Martials were entitled, as of right, to appeal through the Military Courts system up to the Supreme Court. In the lead judgment, Twinomujuni J stated
Article 22(1) of the Constitution provides:
Protection of Right to Life
(1) No person shall be deprived of life intentionally except in execution of a sentence passed in a fair trial by a court of competent jurisdiction in respect of a criminal offence under the laws of Uganda and the conviction and sentence have been confirmed by the highest appellate court. 
Uganda, Constitutional Court, Kotido Field Court Martial case, Judgment, 5 February 2008, p. 28.
Twinomujuni J also stated:
On the afternoon of the 25th March 2002, at exactly 12.50 pm they [the two accused soldiers] were indicted before a Field Court Martial presided over by Col. Sula Semakula and eight other soldiers. They were tried, convicted and three hours after their indictment, they were sentenced to death and executed by a firing squad.  
Uganda, Constitutional Court, Kotido Field Court Martial case, Judgment, 5 February 2008, pp. 22–23.
[emphasis in original]
Twinomujuni J further stated:
I stated earlier in this judgment that article 45 supra of our Constitution clearly states that Chapter IV of the Constitution is not exhaustive of fundamental human rights and freedoms available to the people of Uganda. An automatic right of appeal where one’s fundamental rights and freedoms have been violated is one good example. In the instant case the accused persons in the Kotido trial were entitled to a right to life guaranteed under article 22(1) of the Constitution. The right of appeal was therefore automatic. A denial of that right was clearly unconstitutional. 
Uganda, Constitutional Court, Kotido Field Court Martial case, Judgment, 5 February 2008, p. 36.
Twinomujuni J further stated:
The full meaning of this judgment is that the execution of [the two soldiers] on 25th March 2002 at the orders of a Field Court Martial was illegal, unlawful and unconstitutional. Unfortunately it is irreversible. 
Uganda, Constitutional Court, Kotido Field Court Martial case, Judgment, 5 February 2008, p. 43.