Соответствующая норма
Senegal
Practice Relating to Rule 92. Mutilation and Medical, Scientific or Biological Experiments
Senegal’s Disciplinary Regulations (1990) provides that it is prohibited for soldiers in combat to mutilate the wounded, sick, shipwrecked, prisoners and civilians. 
Senegal, Règlement de Discipline dans les Forces Armées, Décret 90-1159, 12 October 1990, § 2.
Senegal’s IHL Manual (1999) provides that one of the fundamental guarantees common to the IHL conventions and the 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights is the prohibition of medical acts on persons deprived of their liberty which are not justified by the state of health of the person concerned and are not in accordance with the generally accepted and recognized medical norms. 
Senegal, Le DIH adapté au contexte des opérations de maintien de l’ordre, République du Sénégal, Ministère des Forces Armées, Haut Commandement de la Gendarmerie et Direction de la Justice Militaire, Cabinet, 1999, pp. 3 and 24.
Senegal’s Penal Code (1965), as amended in 2007, states:
[a)] Any of the following acts constitutes a war crime if it concerns members of the armed forces, the wounded, sick or shipwrecked, prisoners of war or civilians or objects protected by the provisions of the Geneva Conventions of 12 August 1949:
2. torture or inhuman treatment, including biological experiments …
b) other serious violations of the laws and customs applicable in international armed conflict, within the established framework of international law, namely, any of the following acts [also constitute war crimes]:
9. subjecting persons who are in the power of an adverse party to physical mutilation or to medical or scientific experiments of any kind which are neither justified by the medical, dental or hospital treatment of the person concerned nor carried out in his or her interest, and which cause death to or seriously endanger the health of such person or persons;
c) in case of an armed conflict not of an international character, serious violations of Article 3 common to the four Geneva Conventions of 12 August 1949, namely, any of the following acts committed against persons taking no direct part in hostilities, including members of the armed forces who have laid down their arms and persons placed hors de combat by sickness, wounds, detention or any other cause [also constitute war crimes]:
1. … mutilation …
d) … Other serious violations of the laws and customs applicable in armed conflicts not of an international character, within the established framework of international law, namely, any of the following acts [also constitute war crimes]:
11. subjecting persons who are in the power of another party to the conflict to physical mutilation or to medical or scientific experiments of any kind which are neither justified by the medical, dental or hospital treatment of the person concerned nor carried out in his or her interest, and which cause death to or seriously endanger the health of such person or persons. 
Senegal, Penal Code, 1965, as amended in 2007, Article 431-3(a)(2), (b)(9), (c)(1) and (d)(11).