Соответствующая норма
Peru
Practice Relating to Rule 92. Mutilation and Medical, Scientific or Biological Experiments
Peru’s IHL Manual (2004) states: “Mutilation is prohibited.” 
Peru, Manual de Derecho Internacional Humanitario para las Fuerzas Armadas, Resolución Ministerial Nº 1394-2004-DE/CCFFAA/CDIH-FFAA, Lima, 1 December 2004, § 32.j.
The manual also states:
Medical personnel must refrain from any act that can be classed as a war crime against persons or property protected under international humanitarian law. These include:
(2) … biological experiments and other medical or scientific experiments;
(4) any wilful act or omission which seriously endangers the physical or mental health or integrity of persons; donations of blood for transfusion and skin for grafting are permitted, provided that they are given voluntarily and without any coercion or inducement, and then only for purely therapeutic purposes; all such donations must be noted in medical records. 
Peru, Manual de Derecho Internacional Humanitario para las Fuerzas Armadas, Resolución Ministerial Nº 1394-2004-DE/CCFFAA/CDIH-FFAA, Lima, 1 December 2004, § 83.f.(2) and (4); see also § 84.a and d.
The manual further states:
The following acts, among others, are prohibited and are considered war crimes:
c. any act subjecting a prisoner of war to physical mutilation or to medical or scientific experiments of any kind which are not justified by the medical treatment of the prisoner concerned and carried out in their interest. 
Peru, Manual de Derecho Internacional Humanitario para las Fuerzas Armadas, Resolución Ministerial Nº 1394-2004-DE/CCFFAA/CDIH-FFAA, Lima, 1 December 2004, § 35.c.
In situations of non-international armed conflict, the manual states that “mutilation” committed against persons taking no active part in hostilities, or placed hors de combat, is prohibited. 
Peru, Manual de Derecho Internacional Humanitario para las Fuerzas Armadas, Resolución Ministerial Nº 1394-2004-DE/CCFFAA/CDIH-FFAA, Lima, 1 December 2004, § 71.a.(1).
Peru’s IHL and Human Rights Manual (2010), in a section on the “Civilian Population”, states: “Mutilation is prohibited.” 
Peru, Manual de Derecho Internacional Humanitario y Derechos Humanos para las Fuerzas Armadas, Resolución Ministerial No. 049-2010/DE/VPD, Lima, 21 May 2010, § 33(j), p. 251.
The manual further states:
The following acts, among others, are prohibited and are considered war crimes:
c. any act subjecting a prisoner of war to physical mutilation or to medical or scientific experiments of any kind which are not justified by the medical treatment of the prisoner concerned and carried out in their interest. 
Peru, Manual de Derecho Internacional Humanitario y Derechos Humanos para las Fuerzas Armadas, Resolución Ministerial No. 049-2010/DE/VPD, Lima, 21 May 2010, § 36(c), p. 253.
The manual also states:
[a.] Medical ethics in armed conflict are the same as in peacetime, taking into account that:
(2) experiments on human persons are prohibited. 
Peru, Manual de Derecho Internacional Humanitario y Derechos Humanos para las Fuerzas Armadas, Resolución Ministerial No. 049-2010/DE/VPD, Lima, 21 May 2010, § 75(a)(2), p. 273.
With respect to medical activities, the manual further states:
It is prohibited to subject protected persons to any medical act that is not required by their state of health and to undertake medical, biological or scientific experiments on them.
A small exception is accepted with regard to two medical acts: donations of blood for transfusion and of skin for grafting if they are conducted with the full consent of the donors and for therapeutic purposes. 
Peru, Manual de Derecho Internacional Humanitario y Derechos Humanos para las Fuerzas Armadas, Resolución Ministerial No. 049-2010/DE/VPD, Lima, 21 May 2010, § 75(d), p. 274.
Peru’s Code of Military and Police Justice (2006) states:
Any member of the military or police who in the context of an international or non-international armed conflict:
7. Jeopardizes the life or health of a person protected by international humanitarian law by means of any of the following acts:
a. Subjecting persons without their express and prior consent to experiments which are neither justified from a medical point of view nor carried out in the person’s interest.
b. Extracting organs or tissue except when this is done for medical purposes, in accordance with the standard principles of medicine, and if the person has granted prior and express consent.
c. Resorting to unrecognized treatment methods without a medical necessity, even when the person granted free and express consent.
In these cases, the penalty shall be imprisonment for a period of no less than six and no more than 12 years. 
Peru, Code of Military and Police Justice, 2006, Article 90(7).
This article is no longer in force. Along with certain other articles in this legislation, it was declared unconstitutional by the Constitutional Court (en banc decision for case file No. 0012-2006-PI-TC, 8 January 2007) because it does not stipulate a crime committed in the line of duty that would fall under the jurisdiction of a military court pursuant to Article 173 of Peru’s Constitution.
Peru’s Decree on the Use of Force by the Armed Forces (2010) states:
With respect to the persons mentioned above [i.e. persons not directly participating in hostilities or who have laid down their arms as well as persons placed hors de combat by illness, wounds, detention or any other reason], the following actions are prohibited anytime and anywhere:
a. … mutilations.
f. Threats to carry out any of the aforementioned acts. 
Peru, Decree on the Use of Force by the Armed Forces, 2010, Article 8.1.a and f.