Соответствующая норма
Peru
Practice Relating to Rule 29. Medical Transports
Peru’s IHL Manual (2004) states:
a. Definitions
Medical transportation means the conveyance by land, water or air of the wounded, sick, shipwrecked, medical personnel, religious personnel, medical equipment or medical supplies.
Medical transports means any means of transportation, whether military or civilian, permanent or temporary, assigned exclusively to medical transportation and under the control of a competent authority of a party to the conflict.
Medical transports can be:
(1) permanent, when they are assigned exclusively to medical purposes for an indeterminate period;
(2) temporary, when they are devoted exclusively to medical purposes for limited periods.
It should be noted that all medical transports, whether permanent or temporary, must be assigned exclusively to medical purposes in order to be entitled to protection …
b. Respect and protection
Medical transports must be respected and protected. Respecting them means refraining from attacking or damaging them or preventing their passage. 
Peru, Manual de Derecho Internacional Humanitario para las Fuerzas Armadas, Resolución Ministerial Nº 1394-2004-DE/CCFFAA/CDIH-FFAA, Lima, 1 December 2004, § 87.a and b.
The manual further states “It is prohibited to move … medical transports … or take advantage of their presence to shield certain areas or military objectives from military operations.” 
Peru, Manual de Derecho Internacional Humanitario para las Fuerzas Armadas, Resolución Ministerial Nº 1394-2004-DE/CCFFAA/CDIH-FFAA, Lima, 1 December 2004, § 27.e.(10).
Peru
Peru’s IHL and Human Rights Manual (2010) states:
78. Medical means of transport
a. Definitions
Medical transportation means the conveyance by land, water or air of the wounded, sick, shipwrecked, medical personnel, religious personnel, medical equipment or medical supplies.
Medical transports means any means of transportation, whether military or civilian, permanent or temporary, assigned exclusively to medical transportation and under the control of a competent authority of a party to the conflict.
Medical transports can be:
(1) permanent, when they are assigned exclusively to medical purposes for an indeterminate period;
(2) temporary, when they are devoted exclusively to medical purposes for limited periods.
It should be noted that all medical transports, whether permanent or temporary, must be assigned exclusively to medical purposes in order to be entitled to protection …
b. Respect and protection
Medical transports must be respected and protected. Respecting them means refraining from attacking or damaging them or preventing their passage, that is to say allow them to carry out their designated task. Protecting them presupposes taking action to ensure their respect, which may mean to assist them against third parties or to defend them should this be necessary.
The obligation to respect medical means of transport does not ease unless they are used to commit acts harmful to the enemy (such as transporting soldiers in service or ammunition). 
Peru, Manual de Derecho Internacional Humanitario y Derechos Humanos para las Fuerzas Armadas, Resolución Ministerial No. 049-2010/DE/VPD, Lima, 21 May 2010, § 78, pp. 278–279.
The manual also states that it “is prohibited to move … medical transports … or take advantage of their presence to shield certain areas or military objectives from military operations.” 
Peru, Manual de Derecho Internacional Humanitario y Derechos Humanos para las Fuerzas Armadas, Resolución Ministerial No. 049-2010/DE/VPD, Lima, 21 May 2010, § 28(e)(3), p. 239.
Peru’s Military and Police Criminal Code (2010), in a chapter entitled “Crimes against humanitarian operations and emblems”, states:
A member of the military or the police shall be punished with deprivation of liberty of not less than six years and not more than twenty-five years if, in a state of emergency and when the Armed Forces assume control of the internal order, he or she:
2. Attacks medical … means of transport which are identified with protective signs of the [1949] Geneva Conventions in accordance with International Humanitarian Law. 
Peru, Military and Police Criminal Code, 2010, Article 95(2).
Peru’s IHL Manual (2004) states: “The following classes of enemy aircraft are exempt from attack: … medical aircraft”. 
Peru, Manual de Derecho Internacional Humanitario para las Fuerzas Armadas, Resolución Ministerial Nº 1394-2004-DE/CCFFAA/CDIH-FFAA, Lima, 1 December 2004, § 129.d.(1).(a); see also § 87.a and b.
The manual further states:
Medical aircraft are exempt from attack only if they:
(1) have been recognized as such;
(2) are acting in compliance with an agreement; parties to the conflict are encouraged to notify medical flights and conclude agreements at all times, especially in areas where control by any party to the conflict is not clearly established; when such an agreement is concluded, it shall specify the altitudes, times and routes for safe operation and should include means of identification and communication;
(3) fly in areas under the control of own or friendly forces;
(4) fly outside the area of armed conflict.
In other instances, medical aircraft operate at their own risk. 
Peru, Manual de Derecho Internacional Humanitario para las Fuerzas Armadas, Resolución Ministerial Nº 1394-2004-DE/CCFFAA/CDIH-FFAA, Lima, 1 December 2004, § 129.e.
The manual also states:
Agreements or notifications are required for medical aircraft flying over areas controlled by enemy forces or contact zones.
Medical aircraft may not be used under any circumstances to obtain military information or to search for wounded and shipwrecked persons unless a prior agreement has been made.
Medical aircraft can be inspected. They can be confiscated if the inspection discloses that the aircraft:
(1) is not a medical aircraft;
(2) is being used to gain a military advantage;
(3) has flown without or in breach of a prior agreement.
Aircraft seized in this manner become war booty. 
Peru, Manual de Derecho Internacional Humanitario para las Fuerzas Armadas, Resolución Ministerial Nº 1394-2004-DE/CCFFAA/CDIH-FFAA, Lima, 1 December 2004, § 110.c.
Peru’s IHL and Human Rights Manual (2010) states: “The following classes of enemy aircraft are exempt from attack: … medical aircraft”. 
Peru, Manual de Derecho Internacional Humanitario y Derechos Humanos para las Fuerzas Armadas, Resolución Ministerial No. 049-2010/DE/VPD, Lima, 21 May 2010, § 120(d)(1)(a), p. 311.
The manual also states:
g. Conditions for immunity [from attack] of medical aircraft
Medical aircraft are exempt from attack only if they:
(1) have been recognized as such;
(2) are acting in compliance with an agreement; parties to the conflict are encouraged to notify medical flights and conclude agreements at all times, especially in areas where control by any party to the conflict is not clearly established. When such an agreement is concluded, it shall specify the altitudes, times and routes for safe operation and should include means of identification and communication;
(3) fly in areas under the control of own or friendly forces;
(4) fly outside the area of armed conflict.
h. In other instances, medical aircraft operate at their own risk. 
Peru, Manual de Derecho Internacional Humanitario y Derechos Humanos para las Fuerzas Armadas, Resolución Ministerial No. 049-2010/DE/VPD, Lima, 21 May 2010, § 120(g)–(h), p. 312; see also § 149(d) and (f), pp. 335–336.
The manual further states:
149. Medical Aircraft
a. Medical aircraft must be protected and respected in accordance with the provisions in force.
e. Medical aircraft may not be used to commit acts harmful to the enemy. They may not carry equipment designed to obtain or transmit information. They may not be equipped with arms, with the exception of light weapons for self-defence, and they must only transport medical personnel and medical equipment. 
Peru, Manual de Derecho Internacional Humanitario y Derechos Humanos para las Fuerzas Armadas, Resolución Ministerial No. 049-2010/DE/VPD, Lima, 21 May 2010, § 149(a) and (e), pp. 335–336.
Peru’s IHL Manual (2004) states:
Military hospital ships, that is to say, ships built or equipped by the Powers specially and solely with a view to assisting the wounded, sick and shipwrecked, to treating them and to transporting them, may in no circumstances be attacked or captured, but shall at all times be respected and protected, on condition that their names and descriptions have been notified to the parties to the conflict ten days before those ships are employed. 
Peru, Manual de Derecho Internacional Humanitario para las Fuerzas Armadas, Resolución Ministerial Nº 1394-2004-DE/CCFFAA/CDIH-FFAA, Lima, 1 December 2004, § 157.f; see also §§ 87.a and b, 129.a.(1) and 172.h.
The manual further states:
(1) The exemption from attack of a hospital ship may cease only by reason of a breach of a condition of exemption and, in such a case, only after due warning has been given naming in all appropriate cases a reasonable time limit to discharge itself of the cause endangering its exemption, and after such warning has remained unheeded.
(2) If after due warning a hospital ship persists in breaking a condition of its exemption, it renders itself liable to capture and other necessary measures to enforce compliance.
(3) A hospital ship may only be attacked as a last resort if:
(a) diversion or capture is not feasible;
(b) no other method is available for exercising military control;
(c) the circumstances of non-compliance are sufficiently grave that the hospital ship has become, or may be reasonably assumed to be, a military objective;
(d) the collateral casualties or damage will not be disproportionate to the military advantage gained or expected. 
Peru, Manual de Derecho Internacional Humanitario para las Fuerzas Armadas, Resolución Ministerial Nº 1394-2004-DE/CCFFAA/CDIH-FFAA, Lima, 1 December 2004, § 129.c.
The manual also states: “The names and descriptions of hospital ships must be notified to the parties to the conflict. Hospital ships and coastal rescue craft can be ordered to stop, move away or follow a certain route.” 
Peru, Manual de Derecho Internacional Humanitario para las Fuerzas Armadas, Resolución Ministerial Nº 1394-2004-DE/CCFFAA/CDIH-FFAA, Lima, 1 December 2004, § 110.c.
Peru’s IHL and Human Rights Manual (2010) states:
Military hospital ships, that is to say, ships built or equipped by the powers specially and solely with a view to assisting the wounded, sick and shipwrecked, to treating them and to transporting them, may in no circumstances be attacked or captured, but shall at all times be respected and protected, on condition that their names and descriptions have been notified to the parties to the conflict ten days before those ships are employed. 
Peru, Manual de Derecho Internacional Humanitario y Derechos Humanos para las Fuerzas Armadas, Resolución Ministerial No. 049-2010/DE/VPD, Lima, 21 May 2010, § 148(f), p. 335; see also pp. 396–397.
The manual also states:
The following categories of enemy ships may not be attacked:
(1) Hospital ships.
(2) Coastal rescue craft and other means of medical transport. 
Peru, Manual de Derecho Internacional Humanitario y Derechos Humanos para las Fuerzas Armadas, Resolución Ministerial No. 049-2010/DE/VPD, Lima, 21 May 2010, § 120(a)(1)–(2), p. 310.
The manual further states:
b. Conditions for immunity
… [Hospital ships] only enjoy immunity from attack if:
(1) They act in a way consistent with their usual activities.
(2) They submit to identification and inspection as requested.
(3) They do not intentionally obstruct the movement of combatants and obey orders to stop or move away as requested.
c. Loss of immunity
(1) The immunity of a hospital ship from attacks may only cease if it does not comply with any of the conditions for immunity and, if this is the case, it shall not cease until after due warning has been given, naming, in all appropriate cases, a reasonable time limit to discharge itself of the cause endangering its immunity [from attack], and after such warning has remained unheeded. 
Peru, Manual de Derecho Internacional Humanitario y Derechos Humanos para las Fuerzas Armadas, Resolución Ministerial No. 049-2010/DE/VPD, Lima, 21 May 2010, § 120(b)–(c)(1), p. 310.