Соответствующая норма
Peru
Practice Relating to Rule 142. Instruction in International Humanitarian Law within Armed Forces
Peru’s IHL Manual (2004) states:
a. Preventive measures and mechanisms
The obligations assumed by States Parties to international humanitarian law treaties require them to ensure the proper implementation of the preventive measures and mechanisms provided for in these treaties, including, in particular, the following:
(2) Dissemination of international humanitarian law in State institutions (government ministries, municipal authorities, universities, higher education establishments, military academies and State and private education establishments), with particular reference to the rights that all civilians have in armed conflict situations. 
Peru, Manual de Derecho Internacional Humanitario para las Fuerzas Armadas, Resolución Ministerial Nº 1394-2004-DE/CCFFAA/CDIH-FFAA, Lima, 1 December 2004, § 10.a.(2).
The manual defines the term “dissemination” as: “The obligation of States to teach the rules of international humanitarian law in military training programmes and to encourage the civilian population to study them.” 
Peru, Manual de Derecho Internacional Humanitario para las Fuerzas Armadas, Resolución Ministerial Nº 1394-2004-DE/CCFFAA/CDIH-FFAA, Lima, 1 December 2004, Annex 9, Glossary of Terms.
Peru’s IHL and Human Rights Manual (2010) states:
(a) Preventive measures and mechanisms
The obligations assumed by States Parties to international humanitarian law treaties require them to ensure the proper implementation of the preventive measures and mechanisms provided for in these treaties, including, in particular, the following:
(2) Dissemination of international humanitarian law in State institutions (government ministries, municipal authorities, universities, higher education establishments, military academies and State and private education establishments), with particular reference to the rights that all civilians have in armed conflict situations. 
Peru, Manual de Derecho Internacional Humanitario y Derechos Humanos para las Fuerzas Armadas, Resolución Ministerial No. 049-2010/DE/VPD, Lima, 21 May 2010, § 10(a)(2), p. 221.
In its Glossary of Terms, the manual defines “dissemination” as: “The obligation of States to teach the rules of international humanitarian law in military training programmes and to encourage the civilian population to study them.” 
Peru, Manual de Derecho Internacional Humanitario y Derechos Humanos para las Fuerzas Armadas, Resolución Ministerial No. 049-2010/DE/VPD, Lima, 21 May 2010, p. 403.
Peru’s Law on Compulsory Human Rights Education (2002) provides for the establishment of a national plan on the teaching of human rights and IHL in establishments for military and police training. It states:
The duty to teach human rights and international humanitarian law must aim at full implementation and strict compliance with the international treaties and conventions as well as the protection of fundamental rights in the national and international arena. 
Peru, Law on Compulsory Human Rights Education, 2002, Article 3.
Peru’s Directive on the Instruction of IHL within the Armed Forces (2004) states that its object is “[t]o establish the criteria and provisions for the planning, organization, conduct, coordination and control of the inclusion of international humanitarian law (IHL) applicable in situations of armed conflict into the doctrine and training of the armed forces”. 
Peru, Directive on the Instruction of IHL within the Armed Forces, 2004, Article 1.
At the 27th International Conference of the Red Cross and Red Crescent in 1999, Peru pledged to “strengthen and gradually expand the incorporation of international humanitarian law into the instruction provided to armed and police forces members”. 
Peru, Pledge made at the 27th International Conference of the Red Cross and Red Crescent, Geneva, 31 October–6 November 1999.
According to the Report on the Practice of Peru, which refers to Peru’s military manuals and other teaching materials for the armed forces produced by the Peruvian Ministry of Defence in the 1990s, principles of IHL applicable to international and non-international conflicts are taught to the Peruvian armed forces. 
Report on the Practice of Peru, 1998, Chapter 6.6.
In 2004, in its fourth periodic report to the Committee against Torture, Peru stated:
281. According to the new legislation [Act No. 27741 promulgated on 28 May 2002, which amended article 1 of Act No. 25211], the Political Constitution of Peru, as well as human rights law and international humanitarian law, must be disseminated and systematically and uninterruptedly taught at all levels of the educational system, both civil and military, as well as in university and non-university higher education.
282. According to the general framework described above, the compulsory teaching of human rights law and international humanitarian law must include the full application and strict implementation of all international acts and agreements, as well as the protection of fundamental rights at national and international level. 
Peru, Fourth periodic report to the Committee against Torture, 27 May 2005, UN Doc. CAT/C/SR.697, submitted 15 November 2004, §§ 281–282.
Peru also stated under the heading “Actions sponsored by the Ministry of Defence through the International Humanitarian Law Centre (CDIH)” that the objectives are:
To create awareness among members of the armed forces through training, discussion, research and dissemination of international humanitarian law (IHL) in military institutions. International humanitarian law is currently being incorporated in the doctrine and instruction manuals of the Armed Forces in order to be an integral part of the decision-making and missions of army personnel in strategic, operational and tactical areas. To ensure that enough personnel receive instruction in the subject in order to guarantee full respect for international humanitarian law. 
Peru, Fourth periodic report to the Committee against Torture, 27 May 2005, UN Doc. CAT/C/SR.697, submitted 15 November 2004, § 317; see also §§ 321 and 323.
In 2006, during the consideration of the fourth periodic report of Peru before the Committee against Torture, a representative of Peru stated:
12. … Training … [is] being developed for members of the armed forces through the international humanitarian law centre set up under the current Government, and … [includes] modules on the prohibition of torture in the case of international conflict and non-international armed conflict, in accordance with article 3 of the [1949] Geneva Conventions, and with the [1977] Second Additional Protocol thereto. In the past two years, hundreds of officers … received that training.
13. For the training of officials, the Peruvian authorities … set up a national commission for the study and application of international humanitarian law, and the Ministry of Justice … [is] responsible for a training programme incorporating human rights aspects and the State’s obligations under the Convention against Torture. 
Peru, Statement before the Committee against Torture during the consideration of the fourth periodic report of Peru, 9 May 2006, UN Doc. CAT/C/SR. 697 §§ 12–13.
Peru’s IHL and Human Rights Manual (2010) states: “The commander is responsible for the appropriate instruction of international humanitarian law.” 
Peru, Manual de Derecho Internacional Humanitario y Derechos Humanos para las Fuerzas Armadas, Resolución Ministerial No. 049-2010/DE/VPD, Lima, 21 May 2010, § 20, p. 419; see also § 25(b)(1)(a), p. 227.
The manual also states: “The commander must personally make sure that his subordinates know the obligations stemming from international humanitarian law”. 
Peru, Manual de Derecho Internacional Humanitario y Derechos Humanos para las Fuerzas Armadas, Resolución Ministerial No. 049-2010/DE/VPD, Lima, 21 May 2010, § 19, p. 419; see also § 25(b)(1)(a), p. 227.