Соответствующая норма
Peru
Practice Relating to Rule 118. Provision of Basic Necessities to Persons Deprived of Their Liberty
Peru’s IHL Manual (2004) states with regard to the evacuation of prisoners of war:
b. The evacuation of prisoners of war must always be effected humanely and in conditions similar to those established for the forces of the detaining power.
c. During the evacuation, prisoners must be provided with sufficient food and drinking water and with the clothing and medical attention they need. Precautions must be taken to ensure their safety.
e. Prisoners should be held in transit camps for as short a time as possible and must receive the same treatment there as in an ordinary camp. 
Peru, Manual de Derecho Internacional Humanitario para las Fuerzas Armadas, Resolución Ministerial Nº 1394-2004-DE/CCFFAA/CDIH-FFAA, Lima, 1 December 2004, § 37.b, c and e.
The manual further states: “Prisoner-of-war camps must be kept clean and hygienic. They must have adequate washing and laundry facilities, etc. available at all times of day and night.” 
Peru, Manual de Derecho Internacional Humanitario para las Fuerzas Armadas, Resolución Ministerial Nº 1394-2004-DE/CCFFAA/CDIH-FFAA, Lima, 1 December 2004, § 40.e.
The manual also states:
a. The basic daily food rations must be sufficient in quantity, quality and variety to keep prisoners of war in good health and to prevent loss of weight or the development of nutritional deficiencies. Account must also be taken of the habitual diet of the prisoners.
b. The food rations that are sufficient and appropriate for the troops of the detaining power may not be suitable for prisoners of war used to a different diet. It may be necessary to seek medical and nutritional advice from retained medical personnel in order to plan meals for the prisoners of war. Prisoners of war should also be permitted to be involved in the preparation of their meals. 
Peru, Manual de Derecho Internacional Humanitario para las Fuerzas Armadas, Resolución Ministerial Nº 1394-2004-DE/CCFFAA/CDIH-FFAA, Lima, 1 December 2004, § 42.
The manual further states: “Every prisoner-of-war camp must have an adequate infirmary, and isolation wards must, if necessary, be set aside for cases of contagious or mental disease.” 
Peru, Manual de Derecho Internacional Humanitario para las Fuerzas Armadas, Resolución Ministerial Nº 1394-2004-DE/CCFFAA/CDIH-FFAA, Lima, 1 December 2004, § 44.a.
The manual also states: “The [1949] Third Geneva Convention relative to the Treatment of Prisoners of War contains detailed provisions on … the right to receive relief parcels”. 
Peru, Manual de Derecho Internacional Humanitario y Derechos Humanos para las Fuerzas Armadas, Resolución Ministerial No. 049-2010/DE/VPD, Lima, 21 May 2010, § 57, pp. 262–263.
Peru’s IHL and Human Rights Manual (2010) states:
b. The evacuation of prisoners of war must always be effected humanely and in conditions similar to those established for the forces of the detaining power.
c. During the evacuation, prisoners must be provided with sufficient food and drinking water and with the clothing and medical attention they need. Precautions must be taken to ensure their safety.
e. Prisoners should be held in transit camps for as short a time as possible and must receive the same treatment there as in an ordinary camp. 
Peru, Manual de Derecho Internacional Humanitario y Derechos Humanos para las Fuerzas Armadas, Resolución Ministerial No. 049-2010/DE/VPD, Lima, 21 May 2010, § 38(b)–(c) and (e), p. 254.
The manual further states: “Prisoner-of-war camps must be kept clean and hygienic. They must have adequate washing and laundry facilities, etc. available at all times of day and night.” 
Peru, Manual de Derecho Internacional Humanitario y Derechos Humanos para las Fuerzas Armadas, Resolución Ministerial No. 049-2010/DE/VPD, Lima, 21 May 2010, § 41(e), p. 256.
The manual also states:
a. The basic daily food rations must be sufficient in quantity, quality and variety to keep prisoners of war in good health and to prevent loss of weight or the development of nutritional deficiencies. Account must also be taken of the habitual diet of the prisoners.
b. The food rations that are sufficient and appropriate for the troops of the detaining power may not be suitable for prisoners of war used to a different diet. It may be necessary to seek medical and nutritional advice from retained medical personnel in order to plan meals for the prisoners of war. Prisoners of war should also be permitted to be involved in the preparation of their meals. 
Peru, Manual de Derecho Internacional Humanitario y Derechos Humanos para las Fuerzas Armadas, Resolución Ministerial No. 049-2010/DE/VPD, Lima, 21 May 2010, § 43(a)–(b), p. 257.
The manual further states: “Every prisoner-of-war camp must have an adequate infirmary, and isolation wards must, if necessary, be set aside for cases of contagious or mental disease.” 
Peru, Manual de Derecho Internacional Humanitario y Derechos Humanos para las Fuerzas Armadas, Resolución Ministerial No. 049-2010/DE/VPD, Lima, 21 May 2010, § 45(a), p. 258.
Peru’s Code of Military Justice (1980) provides that depriving prisoners of war of medical care and indispensable food is a punishable offence. 
Peru, Code of Military Justice, 1980, Article 95(1).