Соответствующая норма
Sri Lanka
Practice Relating to Rule 158. Prosecution of War Crimes
Sri Lanka’s Geneva Conventions Act (2006) states:
2. (1) Any person, whether a citizen of Sri Lanka or not, who within or outside Sri Lanka –
(a) commits or attempts to commit; or
(b) aids, abets, conspires or procures the commission by any other person of, a grave breach in terms of the relevant Articles of the Conventions as are set out in Schedule I, Schedule II, Schedule III and Schedule IV to this Act and are also enumerated in subsection (2) of this section, shall be guilty of an offence.
3. Subject to the provisions of section 6, every prosecution for an offence in terms of section 2 shall be by way of direct indictment filed by the Attorney-General. 
Sri Lanka, Geneva Conventions Act, 2006, Sections 2–3.
The Act includes the following paragraph from the 1949 Geneva Conventions:
Each High Contracting Party shall be under the obligation to search for persons alleged to have committed, or to have ordered the commission of such grave breaches, and shall bring such persons, regardless of their nationality, before its own courts. It may also, if it prefers, and in accordance with the provisions of its own legislation, hand such persons over for trial to another High Contracting Party concerned, provided such High Contracting Party has made out a prima facie case. 
Sri Lanka, Geneva Conventions Act, 2006, Schedule I: Article 49, Schedule III: Article 129, and Schedule IV: Article 146; see also Schedule II: Article 50.
In 2012, Sri Lanka’s Ministry of Defence issued a press release entitled “Allow Sri Lanka’s efforts at reconciliation to proceed unimpeded – Minister Samarasinghe at UNHCR, ‘No justification or urgency for resolution to implement LLRC recommendations’”, which stated:
You may have noted that the [LLRC, Lessons Learnt and Reconciliation] Commission offers detailed observations and recommendations on International Humanitarian Law issues relating to the final phases of the conflict. …
The material placed before the Commission points to several specific episodes which, in its view, warrant further investigation. The Government is committed to a mechanism for gathering and assessing factual evidence relating to the episodes indicated, buttressed by a strong investigative arm. The findings thus arrived at will form the basis of a decision on whether criminal proceedings can be instituted. The material yielded by this investigation will be placed before the Attorney-General for a decision in respect of instituting criminal proceedings, where warranted. The Attorney General is currently seized of and is studying the recommendations in the report with regard to allegations of violations of International Humanitarian Law. Military Courts of Inquiry in keeping with international practice have commenced investigations into specific incidents identified by the LLRC.
The mandate of the Court of Inquiry is to investigate, inter alia, civilian casualties and the Channel 4 video footages; including whether any deliberate and intentional attacks were made by the Army on civilians, with a view to causing them harm or damage, or on any hospitals or no-fire zones. If so, the persons responsible for any such activity and to make recommendations with regard to the measures that should be taken with regard to such persons.
… Sri Lanka has taken clear and definite steps towards implementation of the recommendations of the domestic process, barely two months after the report was made public. We have evolved a mechanism to look into accountability issues raised in the LLRC report, both in the form of civil and military structures. 
Sri Lanka, Ministry of Defence, “Allow Sri Lanka’s efforts at reconciliation to proceed unimpeded – Minister Samarasinghe at UNHCR, ‘No justification or urgency for resolution to implement LLRC recommendations’”, Press Release, 27 February 2012, pp. 4–5.
In 2012, in a section entitled “Theme area: International Humanitarian Law Issues” of its National Plan of Action to Implement the Recommendations of the Lessons Learnt and Reconciliation Commission, Sri Lanka’s Government stated:
Recommendation
9.9, 9.37a. – Ascertain more fully the circumstances under which specific instances of death or injury to civilians could have occurred, and if such investigations disclose wrongful conduct, prosecute and punish the wrongdoers.
Activity
1. Complete ongoing disciplinary process being conducted in terms of Armed Forces statutes.
2. Upon conclusion, take follow up action to prosecute, where relevant.
3. Use the existing system as provided for in the Criminal Procedure Code to originate a complaint and give such mechanism sufficient publicity. 
Sri Lanka, Government, National Plan of Action to Implement the Recommendations of the Lessons Learnt and Reconciliation Commission (LLRC), 26 July 2012, p. 1.