Соответствующая норма
Sri Lanka
Practice Relating to Rule 133. Property Rights of Displaced Persons
In 2012, in its fifth periodic report to the Human Rights Committee, Sri Lanka stated:
77. Special emphasis has been given to regulating the activities regarding the management of land in the Northern and Eastern Provinces. The Ministry of Land and Land Development has decided to resolve the land disputes in these areas by implementing a special programme of work. Specific Cabinet approval has been received for policy proposals relating to the matter. Amongst the steps being taken, directions have been given to temporarily suspend the distribution of lands. Priority is to be given to those persons who have been displaced or fled from their natural locales or lost their lands. [footnote: It is proposed to set in place mediation boards in terms of Mediation (Special Provisions) Law to resolve disputes between owners who have paper title and have been displaced and those of them who are in unlawful occupation as an alternate dispute resolution mechanism.]
78. An amendment to the Prescription Ordinance is presently being considered whereby displaced or disadvantaged owners of land will be exempted from the rules of prescription during a period of 30 years, during which the armed conflict took place, so as to enable them to defeat any adverse claims based on the running of time. 
Sri Lanka, Fifth periodic report to the Human Rights Committee, 31 January 2013, UN Doc. CCPR/C/LKA/5, submitted 29 October 2012, §§ 77–78.
In 2012, Sri Lanka’s Ministry of Defence issued a press release entitled “Allow Sri Lanka’s efforts at reconciliation to proceed unimpeded – Minister Samarasinghe at UNHCR, ‘No justification or urgency for resolution to implement LLRC recommendations’”, which stated:
In the 2 years and 9 months since the end of the armed conflict against terrorism and the onset of peace, Sri Lanka has made significant progress towards recovery and achieving reconciliation, by incrementally overcoming many challenges posed to the nation and its people by almost 30 years of conflict. …
… As you know, the [Lessons Learnt and Reconciliation] Commission has now delivered on its mandate and submitted its report, including a series of recommendations, to the President of Sri Lanka. …
In particular, the Commission's recommendations about the formulation of a land use plan for each district in the Northern and Eastern Provinces and, as a longer term initiative, the establishment of a National Land Commission for the country as a whole, require further study and careful planning. … A Land Task Force was established at provincial and district levels to deal with land issues and to seek expeditious solutions, and is further evidence of our efforts. I may also add that the Government is firmly resolved to ensure that all those who have been dispossessed of their lands, are afforded the opportunity to return to the lands they once owned. 
Sri Lanka, Ministry of Defence, “Allow Sri Lanka’s efforts at reconciliation to proceed unimpeded – Minister Samarasinghe at UNHCR, ‘No justification or urgency for resolution to implement LLRC recommendations’”, Press Release, 27 February 2012, pp. 2–3.
In 2012, in a section entitled “Theme area: Human Rights” of its National Plan of Action to Implement the Recommendations of the Lessons Learnt and Reconciliation Commission, which also includes a section entitled “Theme area: International Humanitarian Law Issues”, Sri Lanka’s Government stated:
Recommendation
9.104 – Grant the legal ownership of land to those (IDPs) [internally displaced persons] who have been resettled.
Activity
Continue implementation of circular which provides for grant of ownership. 
Sri Lanka, Government, National Plan of Action to Implement the Recommendations of the Lessons Learnt and Reconciliation Commission (LLRC), 26 July 2012, p. 5.
In 2012, in its fifth periodic report to the Human Rights Committee, Sri Lanka stated:
59. With the termination of military operations and the gradual restoration of normality, the strength of the military in the North has been reduced considerably …
60. The former High Security Zones (HSZs) have ceased to exist. The Palaly cantonment is now the only area in which some security restrictions remain, but even within the Cantonment, civilians have unrestricted access to the airport at Palaly and the Kankesanthurai harbour.
61. While it is true that there are still some civilian properties included in the Cantonment, it must be stressed that civilians have not occupied these properties for the last twenty to twenty-five years. The Government has taken measures to pay compensation to the owners of these properties and to provide alternate land to them. It should also be noted that lands that had been forcefully taken from the people and occupied by the LTTE [Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam] for many years have also been released to their legal owners. The former HSZ in the Eastern Province located in the Sampur area from 2007 has been reduced in extent by 65% and declared a Licensed Zone under the Board of Investment. The IDPs [Internally Displaced Persons] from this area who are to be resettled will be granted alternative land or compensation. 
Sri Lanka, Fifth periodic report to the Human Rights Committee, 31 January 2013, UN Doc. CCPR/C/LKA/5, submitted 29 October 2012, §§ 59–61.