Соответствующая норма
Italy
Practice Relating to Rule 161. International Cooperation in Criminal Proceedings
Italy’s IHL Manual (1991) notes: “International cooperation for the search, arrest, extradition and punishment of persons who have committed [war crimes] is established.” 
Italy, Manuale di diritto umanitario, Introduzione e Volume I, Usi e convenzioni di Guerra, SMD-G-014, Stato Maggiore della Difesa, I Reparto, Ufficio Addestramento e Regolamenti, Rome, 1991, Vol. I, § 86.
Italy’s IHL Manual (1991) notes: “International cooperation for the search, arrest, extradition and punishment of persons who have committed [war crimes] is established.” 
Italy, Manuale di diritto umanitario, Introduzione e Volume I, Usi e convenzioni di Guerra, SMD-G-014, Stato Maggiore della Difesa, I Reparto, Ufficio Addestramento e Regolamenti, Rome, 1991, Vol. I, § 86.
Italy’s Constitution (1947), as amended, provides:
(1) The extradition of a citizen may be permitted only in such cases as are expressly provided for in international conventions.
(2) In no instance shall it be permitted for political offences. 
Italy, Constitution, 1947, as amended, Article 26.
Italy’s Decree-Law on Cooperation with the ICTY (1993) states:
1. Italy shall co-operate with the International Tribunal in accordance with the provisions of the resolution, the statute and this decree.
2. The Minister of Justice shall be the authority competent to receive from the International Tribunal the requests for co-operation mentioned in the following articles and to give effect to such requests. 
Italy, Decree-Law on Cooperation with the ICTY, 1993, Article 2.
Italy’s Law on Cooperation with the ICTR (2002) states:
1. The Italian state shall cooperate with the International Tribunal in accordance with the provisions of the resolution, the statute and this law.
2. The authority which has the power to receive requests for cooperation from the International Tribunal specified by this law and act upon these shall be the Ministry of Justice. 
Italy, Law on Cooperation with the ICTR, 2002, Article 2.
In 1997, during plenary discussions in the UN General Assembly on a report of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY), Italy stated:
The greatest obstacle [to combat impunity of persons indicted by the ICTY] remains the failure by some States and entities in the former Yugoslavia to comply with their obligation to fully cooperate with the Tribunal, in particular with the Tribunal’s orders to arrest and deliver indicted persons to The Hague. This obligation was confirmed and reinforced by the 1995 Dayton Agreement. Italy is of the view that it must be met in the most complete and effective way. Respect for State authority cannot be adduced as a pretext for not cooperating with the Tribunal.
… Italy has consistently supported the activity of the Tribunal and will continue to do so in order to ensure its complete success. 
Italy, Statement before the UN General Assembly, UN Doc. A/52/PV.44, 4 November 1997, p. 8.
Holding perpetrators to account [for] grave violations against children continues to be rare … and yet is a crucial element towards protecting children’s rights … In those cases where national authorities are unwilling or unable to hold perpetrators to account, due to lack of capacity or resources for instance, international justice mechanisms, including through the work of the International Criminal Court, and ad hoc and mixed tribunals, can and should play a complementary role. 
Italy, Statement by the permanent representative of Canada before the UN Security Council during a debate on children and armed conflict, made on behalf of the Friends of Children and Armed Conflict, namely Andorra, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Benin, Canada, Chile, Costa Rica, Croatia, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, Germany, Ghana, Guatemala, Hungary, Italy, Japan, Jordan, Liechtenstein, Mali, Mexico, Namibia, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Peru, Portugal, San Marino, Slovenia, Slovakia, South Africa, the Republic of Korea, Sweden, Switzerland, Tanzania and Uruguay, 17 June 2013, p. 2.
Holding perpetrators to account [for] grave violations against children continues to be rare … and yet is a crucial element towards protecting children’s rights … In those cases where national authorities are unwilling or unable to hold perpetrators to account, due to lack of capacity or resources for instance, international justice mechanisms, including through the work of the International Criminal Court, and ad hoc and mixed tribunals, can and should play a complementary role. 
Japan, Statement by the permanent representative of Canada before the UN Security Council during a debate on children and armed conflict, made on behalf of the Friends of Children and Armed Conflict, namely Andorra, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Benin, Canada, Chile, Costa Rica, Croatia, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, Germany, Ghana, Guatemala, Hungary, Italy, Japan, Jordan, Liechtenstein, Mali, Mexico, Namibia, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Peru, Portugal, San Marino, Slovenia, Slovakia, South Africa, the Republic of Korea, Sweden, Switzerland, Tanzania and Uruguay, 17 June 2013, p. 2.
Holding perpetrators to account [for] grave violations against children continues to be rare … and yet is a crucial element towards protecting children’s rights … In those cases where national authorities are unwilling or unable to hold perpetrators to account, due to lack of capacity or resources for instance, international justice mechanisms, including through the work of the International Criminal Court, and ad hoc and mixed tribunals, can and should play a complementary role. 
Jordan, Statement by the permanent representative of Canada before the UN Security Council during a debate on children and armed conflict, made on behalf of the Friends of Children and Armed Conflict, namely Andorra, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Benin, Canada, Chile, Costa Rica, Croatia, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, Germany, Ghana, Guatemala, Hungary, Italy, Japan, Jordan, Liechtenstein, Mali, Mexico, Namibia, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Peru, Portugal, San Marino, Slovenia, Slovakia, South Africa, the Republic of Korea, Sweden, Switzerland, Tanzania and Uruguay, 17 June 2013, p. 2.