Соответствующая норма
Islamic Republic of Iran
Practice Relating to Rule 74. Chemical Weapons
In 1987, during a debate in the First Committee of the UN General Assembly, the Islamic Republic of Iran stated that it had never retaliated with chemical weapons against Iraq, even though the 1925 Geneva Gas Protocol only prohibited first use. It complained that the world community had not reacted to Iraq’s breach of the 1925 Geneva Gas Protocol. 
Islamic Republic of Iran, Statement before the First Committee of the UN General Assembly, UN Doc. A/C.1/ 42/PV.17, 22 October 1987, pp. 8 and 39–40.
At the Conference of States Parties to the 1925 Geneva Protocol and Other Interested States in 1989, after the ceasefire with Iraq, the Iranian Minister of Foreign Affairs declared that the Islamic Republic of Iran “never resorted to chemical weapons use, even in retaliation”. 
Islamic Republic of Iran, Statement at the Conference of States Parties to the 1925 Geneva Gas Protocol, Paris, 7–11 January 1989, referred to in Gordon M. Burck and Charles C. Flowerree, International Handbook on Chemical Weapons Proliferation, Greenwood Press, New York, 1991, p. 239.
At the 1989 Session of the Government-Industry Conference against Chemical Weapons, the Islamic Republic of Iran declared in its plenary statement that during the war its chemical industry “never took any measure to divert its products for production of chemical weapons”. 
Islamic Republic of Iran, Plenary statement at the Government-Industry Conference against Chemical Weapons, Doc. GICCW/P/36 (Prov), Canberra, 12–22 September 1989, p. 258.
In 1991, during a debate in the First Committee of the UN General Assembly, the Islamic Republic of Iran stated that it wanted the fourth preambular paragraph and the third operative paragraph of Resolution 46/35 B to not only deplore and call for the elimination of the threat of chemical weapons, but also their use. 
Islamic Republic of Iran, Statement before the First Committee of the UN General Assembly, UN Doc. A/C.1/46/PV.33, 11 November 1991, p. 63.
At the First Conference of States Parties to the Chemical Weapons Convention in 1997, the Islamic Republic of Iran stated its commitment to the goals and provisions of the 1993 Chemical Weapons Convention but also said it understood why some of the Arab States had not signed or ratified the Convention on the grounds that Israel refused to get rid of its nuclear weapons. 
Islamic Republic of Iran, Statement at the First Conference of States Parties to the Chemical Weapons Convention, The Hague, 6–23 May 1997.
According to the Report on the Practice of the Islamic Republic of Iran, during the war with Iraq, the Islamic Republic of Iran continuously objected to the use of chemical weapons and asked for the condemnation of Iraq’s use of these weapons. In its protests, the Islamic Republic of Iran did not confine itself to the 1925 Geneva Gas Protocol, but stated that such use should be condemned by all the countries of the world, irrespective of whether they were parties to the Protocol or not. 
Report on the Practice of the Islamic Republic of Iran, 1997, Chapter 3.4.