Соответствующая норма
Iraq
Practice Relating to Rule 85. The Use of Incendiary Weapons against Combatants
In 1976, during discussions in the Ad Hoc Committee on Conventional Weapons established by the CDDH, the representative of Iraq stated:
27. … His Government considered incendiary weapons to be completely inhumane. The sufferings caused by their use could not be minimized, especially as such weapons did not discriminate between civilian and military objectives. There was a tendency for military forces to be more cautious in employing them in attacks, out of regard for the protection of their own forces, but in cities incendiary weapons could present a serious danger to the civilian population.
28. Some delegations seemed to favour criteria which would not prohibit the use of incendiary weapons altogether. In his opinion it was impossible to establish such criteria because of the inherently lethal nature of those weapons. That point had already been brought up by the Secretary-General of the United Nations in his 1972 report entitled “Napalm and other incendiary weapons and all aspects of their possible use” … His delegation was in full agreement with the conclusions in that report to the effect that all efforts should be made to prohibit the use of incendiary weapons in warfare. 
Iraq, Statement at the CDDH, Official Records, Vol. XVI, CDDH/IV/SR.27, 19 May 1976, p. 279, §§ 27–28.
At the Preparatory Conference for the Convention on Certain Conventional Weapons in 1978, Iraq stated that it “desired the prohibition of certain incendiary weapons”. 
Iraq, Statement at the Preparatory Conference for the Convention on Certain Conventional Weapons, UN Doc. A/CONF.95/PREP.CONF./I/SR.8, 6 September 1978, p. 7.
According to the Report on the Practice of Iraq, Iraq has “restrictions and limitations” on the use of incendiary weapons. 
Report on the Practice of Iraq, 1998, Chapter 3.5.