Соответствующая норма
Spain
Practice Relating to Rule 87. Humane Treatment
Spain’s LOAC Manual (2007) states that “all those who are not entitled to a status affording them special or general protection or more favourable treatment have the right to be treated humanely”. 
Spain, Orientaciones. El Derecho de los Conflictos Armados, Tomo 1, Publicación OR7–004, (Edición Segunda), Mando de Adiestramiento y Doctrina, Dirección de Doctrina, Orgánica y Materiales, 2 November 2007, § 1.4.
The manual also states: “Treat all … enemies in your power with humanity”. 
Spain, Orientaciones. El Derecho de los Conflictos Armados, Tomo 1, Publicación OR7–004, (Edición Segunda), Mando de Adiestramiento y Doctrina, Dirección de Doctrina, Orgánica y Materiales, 2 November 2007, § 10.3.e.(1).
The manual further states that the “duties of medical personnel, as established by the law of armed conflict” include: “treat all persons hors de combat humanely”. 
Spain, Orientaciones. El Derecho de los Conflictos Armados, Tomo 1, Publicación OR7–004, (Edición Segunda), Mando de Adiestramiento y Doctrina, Dirección de Doctrina, Orgánica y Materiales, 2 November 2007, § 9.2.a.(2).(a).
Spain’s Penal Code (1995), as amended in 2003, states:
Anyone who [commits any of the following acts] during armed conflict shall be punished with three to seven years’ imprisonment:
3. … [S]ubjecting a protected person to humiliating or degrading treatment. 
Spain, Penal Code, 1995, as amended on 25 November 2003, Article 612(3).
Spain’s Law on the Military Career (2007) states:
The following essential rules define military conduct:
First. … [He or she] shall respect the dignity and inalienable rights of all persons … In no case shall the serviceman or servicewoman be subject to, nor shall they subject others to, measures that undermine their personal dignity. 
Spain, Law on the Military Career, 2007, Article 4(1).
Spain’s Royal Ordinances for the Armed Forces (2009) states that members of the armed forces “[m]ust protect defenceless or disadvantaged persons, in particular women and children, against … humiliating and degrading treatment”. 
Spain, Royal Ordinances for the Armed Forces, 2009, Article 112.
Spain’s Law on the Rights and Duties of Members of the Armed Forces (2011) states:
Article 2. Scope of application
1. This law applies to all members of the Armed Forces who acquire the status of military personnel in accordance with Law 39/2007, of 19 November, on Military Career. Accordingly, it applies to official members of the armed forces, except for those persons in administrative roles whose status as military personnel is suspended and students undergoing military training.
2. This status applies to members of the reserves and aspirants when they are incorporated into the armed forces …
Article 6. Rules of conduct of military personnel
1. The essential rules governing the conduct of military personnel are the following:
Fifth
To act in accordance with respect for the person, the common good, and international law applicable during armed conflict. The dignity and inviolable rights of the person are values which one has the obligation to respect and the right to demand. In no event shall military personnel be subject to, or subject others to, measures which result in the violation of personal dignity or undue restriction of a person’s rights. 
Spain, Law on the Rights and Duties of Members of the Armed Forces, 2011, Articles 2 and 6(1).
In 2010, in the Couso case, which concerned the killing of a Spanish journalist in Baghdad on 8 April 2003 by troops of the United States of America, the Criminal Chamber of Spain’s Supreme Court referred to norms of IHL relevant to the case under review, including Article 147 of the 1949 Geneva Convention IV on acts against the physical integrity or health of protected persons. 
Spain, Supreme Court, Couso case, Judgment, 13 July 2010, Section II(II), Sexto, § 2, p. 13.
Spain’s LOAC Manual (1996) provides that in occupied territory, “the Occupying Power shall treat the inhabitants humanely”. 
Spain, Orientaciones. El Derecho de los Conflictos Armados, Publicación OR7-004, 2 Tomos, aprobado por el Estado Mayor del Ejército, Division de Operaciones, 18 March 1996, Vol. I, § 10.8.i.
Spain’s LOAC Manual (2007) states: “Treat all civilians … in your power with humanity”. 
Spain, Orientaciones. El Derecho de los Conflictos Armados, Tomo 1, Publicación OR7–004, (Edición Segunda), Mando de Adiestramiento y Doctrina, Dirección de Doctrina, Orgánica y Materiales, 2 November 2007, § 5.5.b; see also § 10.3.e.(1).
Spain’s Royal Ordinances for the Armed Forces (2009) states that members of the armed forces “[m]ust treat … members of the civilian population that are in their power … humanely.” 
Spain, Royal Ordinances for the Armed Forces, 2009, Article 107.
In 2010, in its report to the UN General Assembly on the status of the 1977 Additional Protocols, Spain stated:
Article 85 entitled “Principle of Humanity”, contained in Title IV on Operations [of the Royal Ordinances for the Armed Forces (2009)] clearly embodies the spirit of the [1949] Geneva Convention and its [1977] Additional Protocols, as it provides that “[the] … conduct [of members of the armed forces] in any conflict or military operation must conform to the applicable rules of the international treaties on international humanitarian law to which Spain is a party”.
That is further developed in Chapter VI on Ethics in Operations, which goes into specific duties under international humanitarian law … the protection of the … civilian population. 
Spain, Report on the Status of the Protocols Additional to the Geneva Conventions of 1949 and relating to the protection of victims of armed conflict, 5 May 2010, Section 2.
Spain’s LOAC Manual (1996) provides that the wounded and sick shall be treated humanely. 
Spain, Orientaciones. El Derecho de los Conflictos Armados, Publicación OR7-004, 2 Tomos, aprobado por el Estado Mayor del Ejército, Division de Operaciones, 18 March 1996, Vol. I, §§ 5.5b, and 7.3.a.(11).
Spain’s LOAC Manual (2007) provides that the wounded and sick shall be treated humanely. 
Spain, Orientaciones. El Derecho de los Conflictos Armados, Tomo 1, Publicación OR7–004, (Edición Segunda), Mando de Adiestramiento y Doctrina, Dirección de Doctrina, Orgánica y Materiales, 2 November 2007, § 5.5.b; see also § 7.3.a.(11).
Spain’s Royal Ordinances for the Armed Forces (2009) states that members of the armed forces “[m]ust treat … the wounded, sick [and] shipwrecked … that are in their power … humanely.” 
Spain, Royal Ordinances for the Armed Forces, 2009, Article 107.
In 2010, in its report to the UN General Assembly on the status of the 1977 Additional Protocols, Spain stated:
Article 85 entitled “Principle of Humanity”, contained in Title IV on Operations [of the Royal Ordinances for the Armed Forces (2009)] clearly embodies the spirit of the [1949] Geneva Convention and its [1977] Additional Protocols, as it provides that “[the] … conduct [of members of the armed forces] in any conflict or military operation must conform to the applicable rules of the international treaties on international humanitarian law to which Spain is a party”.
That is further developed in Chapter VI on Ethics in Operations, which goes into specific duties under international humanitarian law … the protection of the wounded, sick, [and] shipwrecked. 
Spain, Report on the Status of the Protocols Additional to the Geneva Conventions of 1949 and relating to the protection of victims of armed conflict, 5 May 2010, Section 2.
Spain’s LOAC Manual (1996) provides that captured enemy combatants, those who surrender and prisoners of war must be respected and treated with humanity. 
Spain, Orientaciones. El Derecho de los Conflictos Armados, Publicación OR7-004, 2 Tomos, aprobado por el Estado Mayor del Ejército, Division de Operaciones, 18 March 1996, Vol. I, §§ 7.3.a.(7), 8.4.a.(1), 10.6.b.(2), 10.6.c. and 10.8.f.(2).
Spain’s LOAC Manual (2007) states: “In international conflicts, unlawful combatants … and persons whose status is in doubt must be treated with humanity and respect when they are captured, in the same way as lawful combatants.” 
Spain, Orientaciones. El Derecho de los Conflictos Armados, Tomo 1, Publicación OR7–004, (Edición Segunda), Mando de Adiestramiento y Doctrina, Dirección de Doctrina, Orgánica y Materiales, 2 November 2007, § 5.5.b; see also § 7.3.a.(7).
The manual also states that prisoners of war “must be treated humanely”. 
Spain, Orientaciones. El Derecho de los Conflictos Armados, Tomo 1, Publicación OR7–004, (Edición Segunda), Mando de Adiestramiento y Doctrina, Dirección de Doctrina, Orgánica y Materiales, 2 November 2007, § 8.4.a.(1); see also § 10.3.e.(1).
The manual further states with regard to combatants without prisoner-of-war status:
They should be given the chance to surrender and, once hors de combat, must be treated humanely. No acts of violence must be committed against them unless they carry out a hostile act or attempt to escape. … What is important is that they treat them with humanity and respect once they are hors de combat. 
Spain, Orientaciones. El Derecho de los Conflictos Armados, Tomo 1, Publicación OR7–004, (Edición Segunda), Mando de Adiestramiento y Doctrina, Dirección de Doctrina, Orgánica y Materiales, 2 November 2007, § 7.3.a.(8).
Spain’s Royal Ordinances for the Armed Forces (2009) states that members of the armed forces “[m]ust treat … prisoners [and] detainees … that are in their power … humanely.” 
Spain, Royal Ordinances for the Armed Forces, 2009, Article 107; see also Article 110.
In 2010, in its report to the UN General Assembly on the status of the 1977 Additional Protocols, Spain stated:
Article 85 entitled “Principle of Humanity”, contained in Title IV on Operations [of the Royal Ordinances for the Armed Forces (2009)] clearly embodies the spirit of the [1949] Geneva Convention and its [1977] Additional Protocols, as it provides that “[the] … conduct [of members of the armed forces] in any conflict or military operation must conform to the applicable rules of the international treaties on international humanitarian law to which Spain is a party”.
That is further developed in Chapter VI on Ethics in Operations, which goes into specific duties under international humanitarian law … the protection of … prisoners, [and] detainees. 
Spain, Report on the Status of the Protocols Additional to the Geneva Conventions of 1949 and relating to the protection of victims of armed conflict, 5 May 2010, Section 2.