Соответствующая норма
Spain
Practice Relating to Rule 8. Definition of Military Objectives
Spain’s LOAC Manual (1996) states:
4.2.b. … military objectives are … objects which by their nature, location, purpose or use make an effective contribution to military action or whose total or partial destruction, capture or neutralization, in the circumstances ruling at the time, offers a definite military advantage.
4.2.b.(2) … insofar as objects are concerned, there can only be considered military objectives those objects which by their nature, location, purpose or use make an effective contribution to military action or whose total or partial destruction, capture or neutralization, in the circumstances ruling at the time, offers a clear military advantage. 
Spain, Orientaciones. El Derecho de los Conflictos Armados, Publicación OR7-004, 2 Tomos, aprobado por el Estado Mayor del Ejército, División de Operaciones, 18 March 1996, Vol. I, §§ 4.2.b and 4.2.b.(2).
Spain’s LOAC Manual (2007) states:
Military objectives are those objects which by their nature, location, purpose or use make an effective contribution to military action and whose total or partial destruction, capture or neutralization, in the circumstances ruling at the time, offers a definite military advantage. 
Spain, Orientaciones. El Derecho de los Conflictos Armados, Tomo 1, Publicación OR7–004, (Edición Segunda), Mando de Adiestramiento y Doctrina, Dirección de Doctrina, Orgánica y Materiales, 2 November 2007, § 1.3.b.(1); see also § 4.2.b.(1).
In defining “definite military advantage”, the manual states: “‘Definite military advantage’ means a concrete advantage. It is not therefore lawful to launch attacks that only make indirect contributions or offer possible advantages.” 
Spain, Orientaciones. El Derecho de los Conflictos Armados, Tomo 1, Publicación OR7–004, (Edición Segunda), Mando de Adiestramiento y Doctrina, Dirección de Doctrina, Orgánica y Materiales, 2 November 2007, § 4.2.b.
The manual further states: “A target can only be considered a military objective when sufficient information has been obtained to dispel any doubts and establish reasonable certainty about its nature, based on the facts available at that time.” 
Spain, Orientaciones. El Derecho de los Conflictos Armados, Tomo 1, Publicación OR7–004, (Edición Segunda), Mando de Adiestramiento y Doctrina, Dirección de Doctrina, Orgánica y Materiales, 2 November 2007, § 4.4.a.
The manual also states: “The principle of military necessity is implicit in the definition of military objectives.” 
Spain, Orientaciones. El Derecho de los Conflictos Armados, Tomo 1, Publicación OR7–004, (Edición Segunda), Mando de Adiestramiento y Doctrina, Dirección de Doctrina, Orgánica y Materiales, 2 November 2007, § 2.4.c.(6).
Upon ratification of the 1977 Additional Protocol I, Spain stated with respect to Articles 51, 52 and 57 of the Protocol:
It is the understanding [of the Spanish Government] that the “military advantage” which these articles mention refers to the advantage expected from the attack as a whole and not from isolated parts of it. 
Spain, Interpretative declarations made upon ratification of the 1977 Additional Protocol I, 21 April 1989, § 6.
Spain’s LOAC Manual (1996) states that “the armed forces, except medical and religious personnel” are military objectives. 
Spain, Orientaciones. El Derecho de los Conflictos Armados, Publicación OR7-004, 2 Tomos, aprobado por el Estado Mayor del Ejército, División de Operaciones, 18 March 1996, Vol. I, § 4.2.b; see also § 4.2.b.(1).
Spain’s LOAC Manual (2007) states that “the armed forces, except medical personnel, religious personnel and personnel engaged solely in civil defence tasks,” are military objectives. 
Spain, Orientaciones. El Derecho de los Conflictos Armados, Tomo 1, Publicación OR7–004, (Edición Segunda), Mando de Adiestramiento y Doctrina, Dirección de Doctrina, Orgánica y Materiales, 2 November 2007, § 4.2.b; see also § 7.3.a.(6).
The manual further states: “People that can be targeted as military objectives are all those who can be considered combatants.” 
Spain, Orientaciones. El Derecho de los Conflictos Armados, Tomo 1, Publicación OR7–004, (Edición Segunda), Mando de Adiestramiento y Doctrina, Dirección de Doctrina, Orgánica y Materiales, 2 November 2007, § 4.2.b.(1).
The manual also states that “combatants, including airborne troops during their descent” are military objectives. 
Spain, Orientaciones. El Derecho de los Conflictos Armados, Tomo 1, Publicación OR7–004, (Edición Segunda), Mando de Adiestramiento y Doctrina, Dirección de Doctrina, Orgánica y Materiales, 2 November 2007, § 4.5.b.(1).(a); see also § 7.3.a.(6).
According to Spain’s LOAC Manual (1996), “establishments, constructions and positions where armed forces are located [and] establishments and installations of combat support services and logistics” are military objectives. 
Spain, Orientaciones. El Derecho de los Conflictos Armados, Publicación OR7-004, 2 Tomos, aprobado por el Estado Mayor del Ejército, Division de Operaciones, 18 March 1996, Vol. I, § 4.5.b.(2).a.
Spain’s LOAC Manual (2007) states that “establishments, constructions and positions where armed forces are located [and] establishments and facilities of combat support services and logistics services” are military objectives. 
Spain, Orientaciones. El Derecho de los Conflictos Armados, Tomo 1, Publicación OR7–004, (Edición Segunda), Mando de Adiestramiento y Doctrina, Dirección de Doctrina, Orgánica y Materiales, 2 November 2007, § 4.5.b.(2).(a).
Spain’s Field Regulations (1882) stipulates that objects useful in war, inter alia, arms, munitions, machines and tanks, are objects on which an attack is lawful. 
Spain, El Reglamento para el Servicio de Campaña, 4 January 1882, § 880.
According to Spain’s LOAC Manual (1996), “military vehicles, warships and military aircraft [and] materiel, objects and goods belonging to the armed forces and which serve no medical or religious purpose” are military objectives. 
Spain, Orientaciones. El Derecho de los Conflictos Armados, Publicación OR7-004, 2 Tomos, aprobado por el Estado Mayor del Ejército, Division de Operaciones, 18 March 1996, Vol. I, § 4.5.b.(2).a.
Spain’s LOAC Manual (2007) states that “military vehicles, ships and aircraft [and] materiel, objects and property of the armed forces that are not of a medical or religious nature” are military objectives. 
Spain, Orientaciones. El Derecho de los Conflictos Armados, Tomo 1, Publicación OR7–004, (Edición Segunda), Mando de Adiestramiento y Doctrina, Dirección de Doctrina, Orgánica y Materiales, 2 November 2007, § 4.5.b.(2).(a).
Spain’s Field Regulations (1882) stipulates that bridges and railway equipment are legitimate objects of attack. 
Spain, El Reglamento para el Servicio de Campaña, 4 January 1882, § 880.
Spain’s LOAC Manual (2007) states that military objectives include:
[C]ivilian vehicles, ships and aircraft when they take part in hostilities, transport troops or military supplies, are escorted by military personnel (unless there is an agreement to the contrary), cross duly marked prohibited areas (unless there is an agreement to the contrary), disobey an order to stop or actively resist inspection. 
Spain, Orientaciones. El Derecho de los Conflictos Armados, Tomo 1, Publicación OR7–004, (Edición Segunda), Mando de Adiestramiento y Doctrina, Dirección de Doctrina, Orgánica y Materiales, 2 November 2007, § 4.5.b.(2).(a).
According to Spain’s LOAC Manual (1996), “economic–industrial objectives which make an effective and real contribution to military action” are military objectives. 
Spain, Orientaciones. El Derecho de los Conflictos Armados, Publicación OR7-004, 2 Tomos, aprobado por el Estado Mayor del Ejército, Division de Operaciones, 18 March 1996, Vol. I, § 4.5.b.(2).a.
Spain’s LOAC Manual (2007) states that “economic and industrial objectives that make a real and effective contribution to military action” are military objectives. 
Spain, Orientaciones. El Derecho de los Conflictos Armados, Tomo 1, Publicación OR7–004, (Edición Segunda), Mando de Adiestramiento y Doctrina, Dirección de Doctrina, Orgánica y Materiales, 2 November 2007, § 4.5.b.(2).(a).
Spain’s LOAC Manual (1996) states:
The capture or preservation of a specific area of land constitutes a military objective when it meets all the requirements laid down in Article 52 of Additional Protocol I and it confers a concrete military advantage taking into account the circumstances ruling at the time. 
Spain, Orientaciones. El Derecho de los Conflictos Armados, Publicación OR7-004, 2 Tomos, aprobado por el Estado Mayor del Ejército, Division de Operaciones, 18 March 1996, Vol. I, § 4.4.d; see also § 2.3.b.(1).
Spain’s LOAC Manual (2007) states:
Taking or holding a certain area of land is considered a military objective, when all the requirements laid down in article 52 of [the 1977] Additional Protocol I are met and it provides a concrete military advantage, taking into account the circumstances prevailing at the time. 
Spain, Orientaciones. El Derecho de los Conflictos Armados, Tomo 1, Publicación OR7–004, (Edición Segunda), Mando de Adiestramiento y Doctrina, Dirección de Doctrina, Orgánica y Materiales, 2 November 2007, § 4.4.d; see also §§ 2.3.b.(1) and 4.2.b.
The Report on the Practice of Spain (1998) notes that the fact that a particular zone may be considered a military objective provided it fulfils the requirements of Article 52(2) of the 1977 Additional Protocol I is consistent with the possibility provided for under Spanish law of establishing zones of interest for national defence, comprising “expanses of land, sea, or airspace declared as such because they constitute or may constitute a permanent base or an effective aid to offensive action necessary for such purpose”. 
Report on the Practice of Spain, 1998, Chapter 1.3, referring to Zones and Installations Law, 1975, Article 2.
Upon ratification of the 1977 Additional Protocol I, Spain stated:
It is the understanding [of the Spanish Government] that the capture or holding of a specific area of territory constitutes a military objective when all the conditions set out in this paragraph [paragraph 2 of Article 52] together offer a concrete military advantage taking into account the circumstances at the relevant time. 
Spain, Declarations made upon ratification of the 1977 Additional Protocol I, 21 April 1989, § 7.
Spain’s Field Regulations (1882) deals with the question of whether protection should be granted to “individuals who, forming part of a field army, are nonetheless not combatants in the strict sense of the word, such as employees and operatives of administrative and technical bodies, drivers, cleaners”. 
Spain, El Reglamento para el Servicio de Campaña, 4 January 1882, Article 853.
According to the Regulations, such individuals “who are not military personnel but follow armies to the battlefield are naturally exposed to the same dangers and cannot expect to be treated differently; but once their position and functions have been identified, they must be respected”. 
Spain, El Reglamento para el Servicio de Campaña, 4 January 1882, Article 855.
Spain’s LOAC Manual (1996) states that “indirect objectives” are objectives:
which may not be the object of a direct attack but which can suffer the consequences of an attack upon a military objective. Such is the case for civilians … who may suffer the effects of an attack upon a legitimate military objective due to:
–their proximity to a military objective aimed at shielding that objective against attack;
–their carrying out activities supporting military operations (units of workers, workers in arms factories, etc.). 
Spain, Orientaciones. El Derecho de los Conflictos Armados, Publicación OR7-004, 2 Tomos, aprobado por el Estado Mayor del Ejército, Division de Operaciones, 18 March 1996, Vol. I, § 4.4.e; see also § 2.3.b.(1).
The manual further provides that civilian personnel who accompany and render services to the armed forces “do not have the protected status of the civilian population but are entitled to the status of prisoner of war in case of capture”. 
Spain, Orientaciones. El Derecho de los Conflictos Armados, Publicación OR7-004, 2 Tomos, aprobado por el Estado Mayor del Ejército, Division de Operaciones, 18 March 1996, Vol. I, § 5.2.a.(2).
Spain’s LOAC Manual (2007) states: “A military objective continues to be considered as such even if there are civilians or civilian property in the vicinity.” 
Spain, Orientaciones. El Derecho de los Conflictos Armados, Tomo 1, Publicación OR7–004, (Edición Segunda), Mando de Adiestramiento y Doctrina, Dirección de Doctrina, Orgánica y Materiales, 2 November 2007, § 2.3.b.(1).
The manual further states:
Indirect objectives are those that cannot be directly attacked, but may suffer the consequences of an attack on a military objective.
Civilians … are considered to be indirect objectives that may suffer the effects of an attack on a legitimate military target in the following cases:
- presence in the vicinity of a military objective, with a view to shielding it from attacks;
- activities that support military operations (labour units, workers in weapons factories, etc.). 
Spain, Orientaciones. El Derecho de los Conflictos Armados, Tomo 1, Publicación OR7–004, (Edición Segunda), Mando de Adiestramiento y Doctrina, Dirección de Doctrina, Orgánica y Materiales, 2 November 2007, § 4.4.e.
The manual also states that civilian personnel accompanying and providing services to the armed forces “are not protected as civilians, but they are entitled to prisoner-of-war status if they are captured”. 
Spain, Orientaciones. El Derecho de los Conflictos Armados, Tomo 1, Publicación OR7–004, (Edición Segunda), Mando de Adiestramiento y Doctrina, Dirección de Doctrina, Orgánica y Materiales, 2 November 2007, § 5.2.a.(2).(b); see also § 7.3.a.(3).