Соответствующая норма
Spain
Practice Relating to Rule 73. Biological Weapons
Spain’s LOAC Manual (1996) states: “It is prohibited to use … bacteriological weapons.” It repeats the content of Article 1 of the 1972 Biological Weapons Convention. 
Spain, Orientaciones. El Derecho de los Conflictos Armados, Publicación OR7-004, 2 Tomos, aprobado por el Estado Mayor del Ejército, Division de Operaciones, 18 March 1996, §§ 3.2.c.(1) and 3.2.c(2).
Spain’s LOAC Manual (2007) states that there is an absolute prohibition on the use of certain weapons, including “[b]iological, bacteriological and toxin weapons”. 
Spain, Orientaciones. El Derecho de los Conflictos Armados, Tomo 1, Publicación OR7–004, (Edición Segunda), Mando de Adiestramiento y Doctrina, Dirección de Doctrina, Orgánica y Materiales, 2 November 2007, § 3.2.b.
The manual repeats extracts from Articles I and II of the 1972 Biological Weapons Convention. 
Spain, Orientaciones. El Derecho de los Conflictos Armados, Tomo 1, Publicación OR7–004, (Edición Segunda), Mando de Adiestramiento y Doctrina, Dirección de Doctrina, Orgánica y Materiales, 2 November 2007, § 3.2.b.(1).
Spain’s Penal Code (1995), as amended in 2003, states:
Resorting to genetic engineering in order to produce biological or other weapons capable of exterminating the human species shall be punished with three to seven years’ imprisonment and a special prohibition to hold public office or position or to undertake public work or activities for seven to ten years. 
Spain, Penal Code, 1995, as amended on 25 November 2003, Article 160(1).
The Penal Code further states:
1. Any person who manufactures, commercializes or stockpiles weapons or munitions without authorization by law or competent authority shall be punished:
1.° In the case of … biological weapons, with five to ten years’ imprisonment for promoters and organizers, and three to five years’ imprisonment in the case of accessories.
3.° The same penalties shall apply, considering the perpetrators’ degree of participation, to the trafficking of … biological weapons.
2. The same penalties as established in point 1.° in sub-section 1 shall apply to whoever develops or uses … biological weapons or makes preparations for their use. 
Spain, Penal Code, 1995, as amended on 25 November 2003, Article 566(1)–(2).
The Penal Code also states:
1. … Stockpiling of … biological weapons is understood as the manufacture, commercialization or possession of these weapons.
2. … [B]iological weapons are understood as defined by the international treaties and covenants to which Spain is a party.
The development of … biological weapons is understood as any activity comprising scientific or technical research or examination leading to the creation of a new … biological weapon or the modification of an existing biological … weapon. 
Spain, Penal Code, 1995, as amended on 25 November 2003, Article 567(1)–(2).
In the preliminary stages of the First Review Conference of States Parties to the Biological Weapons Convention in 1980, Spain stated: “Since Spain is not developing or producing bacteriological (biological) or toxin weapons or acquiring them from any other country, the conditions referred to in articles I, II, III, IV, V and X of the [1972 Biological Weapons Convention] do not exist [for Spain].” 
Spain, Response to the request by the Preparatory Committee for the First Review Conference of States Parties to the Biological Weapons Convention, Geneva, 3–21 March 1980, excerpted in UN Doc. BWC/CONF.I/4, 20 February 1980, § 47.