Соответствующая норма
Spain
Practice Relating to Rule 67. Inviolability of Parlementaires
Spain’s Field Regulations (1882) states: “The person of the parlementaire is inviolable.” It adds that in a combat situation, fire must not be stopped when a parlementaire approaches, until superior orders have been given to do so. 
Spain, El Reglamento para el Servicio de Campaña, 4 January 1882, §§ 902 and 904.
Spain’s LOAC Manual (1996) provides:
Parlementaires and persons accompanying them are inviolable. When entering an area controlled by the adverse party, the parlementaires and those accompanying them must not be taken prisoner or detained … and they must adopt appropriate measures for their return to take place in secure conditions. The presence of parlementaires and the beginning of negotiations is not in itself a sufficient reason to alter the course of operations. 
Spain, Orientaciones. El Derecho de los Conflictos Armados, Publicación OR7-004, 2 Tomos, aprobado por el Estado Mayor del Ejército, Division de Operaciones, 18 March 1996, Vol. I, § 2.6.c.(1).
Spain’s LOAC Manual (2007) states:
Parlementaires and those who accompany them are inviolable. When a flag party enters the area controlled by the adverse party, it cannot be taken prisoner or detained. They must be treated according to the rules of military etiquette, and the necessary measures must be taken to ensure their safe return. The presence of a flag party and the start of negotiations do not necessarily constitute a reason to alter the course of operations in progress. 
Spain, Orientaciones. El Derecho de los Conflictos Armados, Tomo 1, Publicación OR7–004, (Edición Segunda), Mando de Adiestramiento y Doctrina, Dirección de Doctrina, Orgánica y Materiales, 2 November 2007, § 2.6.c.(1); see also § 5.2.a.(1).(b).
The manual also states: “Respect all persons … bearing … the white flag of truce”. 
Spain, Orientaciones. El Derecho de los Conflictos Armados, Tomo 1, Publicación OR7–004, (Edición Segunda), Mando de Adiestramiento y Doctrina, Dirección de Doctrina, Orgánica y Materiales, 2 November 2007, § 10.3.e.(1).
The manual further states with respect to parlementaires: “Flag parties, including drivers and interpreters, are inviolable, except if it is proved in a clear and incontestable manner that they have taken advantage of their privileged position to commit an act that is harmful to the adverse party.” 
Spain, Orientaciones. El Derecho de los Conflictos Armados, Tomo 1, Publicación OR7–004, (Edición Segunda), Mando de Adiestramiento y Doctrina, Dirección de Doctrina, Orgánica y Materiales, 2 November 2007, § 7.5.c.
Spain’s Royal Ordinance for the Armed Forces (1978) provides that it is prohibited to attack or retain parlementaires. 
Spain, Royal Ordinance for the Armed Forces, 1978, Article 138.
Spain’s Military Criminal Code (1985) punishes any soldier who “offends in words or in deeds or unduly retains a parlementaire or the persons who accompany him”. 
Spain, Military Criminal Code, 1985, Article 75(2).
Spain’s Penal Code (1995) punishes “anyone who, during an armed conflict, … infringes on the inviolability of, or retains unduly, a parlementaire or any person who accompanies him”. 
Spain, Penal Code, 1995, Article 612(6).
The Penal Code only refers to parlementaires protected under the 1899 Hague Convention (II). 
Spain, Penal Code, 1995, Article 608(5).