Соответствующая норма
Côte d’Ivoire
Practice Relating to Rule 42. Works and Installations Containing Dangerous Forces
Côte d’Ivoire’s Teaching Manual (2007) provides in Book I (Basic instruction):
Lesson 1. Basic notions of IHL
The principle of distinction specifies who and what can be attacked and who and what cannot be attacked.
- Who and what must be protected?
- dams, dykes, nuclear stations.
Lesson 2. Identification
II.2 Persons and objects under special protection
- dams, dykes, nuclear stations. 
Côte d’Ivoire, Droit de la guerre, Manuel d’instruction, Livre I: Instruction de base, Ministère de la Défense, Forces Armées Nationales, November 2007, pp. 14–15, 17 and 19.
In Book III, Volume 1 (Instruction of first-year trainee officers), the Teaching Manual provides:
III. 3. Works and installations containing dangerous forces
The law contains a very precise definition of the term “dangerous forces”, which only applies to dams, dykes and nuclear electrical generating stations. 
Côte d’Ivoire, Droit de la guerre, Manuel d’instruction, Livre III, Tome 1: Instruction de l’élève officier d’active de 1ère année, Manuel de l’élève, Ministère de la Défense, Forces Armées Nationales, November 2007, p. 33.
In Book III, Volume 2 (Instruction of second-year trainee officers), the Teaching Manual provides:
II.2.4. Protection of objects containing dangerous forces
The law contains a very precise definition of the term “dangerous forces”, which only applies to dams, dykes and nuclear electrical generating stations. These installations, as well as military objectives in their vicinity, must not be made the object of attacks if these risk causing the release of dangerous forces likely to lead to catastrophic effects for the civilian population, such as, for example, severe flooding or the release of radioactive materials. The consequences of such an attack could, of course, also have fatal effects on the operations or the troops. …
Furthermore, this protection ceases if the adversaries abuse the protection accorded by the law and use these installations in regular, significant and direct support of their military operations. In such a case, imperative military necessity can perfectly force the troops to neutralize them if there is no other way to stop the abuse. 
Côte d’Ivoire, Droit de la guerre, Manuel d’instruction, Livre III, Tome 2: Instruction de l’élève officier d’active de 2ème année, Manuel de l’instructeur, Ministère de la Défense, Forces Armées Nationales, November 2007, p. 31.
In Book IV (Instruction of heads of division and company commanders), the Teaching Manual provides:
II.2.2. Works and installations containing dangerous forces
The expression means works (or installations) containing forces which, if released, can cause grave losses among the civilian population. They are mainly dams, dykes and nuclear electrical generating stations. In general, these works must not be made the object of attacks, even if they constitute legitimate military objectives. …
Other military objectives located at or in the vicinity of these works or installations shall not be made the object of attack if such attack may cause the release of dangerous forces from the works or installations and consequent severe losses among the civilian population. …
The protection assured by the LOAC to dams, dykes and nuclear electrical generating stations as well as to other legitimate objectives in the vicinity of these works is not absolute. Protection ceases in the following circumstances:
- for a dam or a dyke only if it is used for other than its normal function and in regular, significant and direct support of military operations and if such attack is the only feasible way to terminate such support;
- for a nuclear electrical generating station only if it provides electric power in regular, significant and direct support of military operations and if such attack is the only feasible way to terminate such support;
- for other military objectives located at or in the vicinity of these works or installations only if they are used in regular, significant and direct support of military operations and if such attack is the only feasible way to terminate such support. 
Côte d’Ivoire, Droit de la guerre, Manuel d’instruction, Livre IV: Instruction du chef de section et du commandant de compagnie, Manuel de l’élève, Ministère de la Défense, Forces Armées Nationales, November 2007, pp. 36–37.
Côte d’Ivoire’s Teaching Manual (2007) provides in Book III, Volume 2 (Instruction of second-year trainee officers):
The law contains a very precise definition of the term “dangerous forces”, which only applies to dams, dykes and nuclear electrical generating stations … This rule also imposes a duty to abstain from locating military objectives in the vicinity of these installations. 
Côte d’Ivoire, Droit de la guerre, Manuel d’instruction, Livre III, Tome 2: Instruction de l’élève officier d’active de 2ème année, Manuel de l’instructeur, Ministère de la Défense, Forces Armées Nationales, November 2007, p. 31.
In Book IV (Instruction of heads of division and company commanders), the Teaching Manual provides:
II.2.2. Works and installations containing dangerous forces
The Parties to the conflict should avoid locating legitimate objectives in the vicinity of these works or installations. Weapons located at these places for the sole purpose of defending these installations are permitted. 
Côte d’Ivoire, Droit de la guerre, Manuel d’instruction, Livre IV: Instruction du chef de section et du commandant de compagnie, Manuel de l’élève, Ministère de la Défense, Forces Armées Nationales, November 2007, p. 37.