Соответствующая норма
Switzerland
Practice Relating to Rule 156. Definition of War Crimes
Switzerland’s Basic Military Manual (1987) provides:
Violations of the laws and customs of war, commonly called war crimes, engage the individual responsibility of the persons who committed them as well as the responsibility of the States to which the perpetrators of the violation are nationals. 
Switzerland, Lois et coutumes de la guerre (Extrait et commentaire), Règlement 51.7/II f, Armée Suisse, 1987, Article 191.
The manual then provides a list of grave breaches of the 1949 Geneva Conventions and of the 1977 Additional Protocol I. 
Switzerland, Lois et coutumes de la guerre (Extrait et commentaire), Règlement 51.7/II f, Armée Suisse, 1987, Articles 192 and 193.
Switzerland’s Regulation on Legal Bases for Conduct during an Engagement (2005) states:
War crimes, i.e. violations of the international law of armed conflict, must in serious cases be reported to the investigating military authorities by the competent superior. Sanctions are the responsibility of the military justice system. The competent commander is responsible for disciplinary sanctions for minor offences. 
Switzerland, Bases légales du comportement à l’engagement (BCE), Règlement 51.007/IVf, Swiss Army, issued based on Article 10 of the Ordinance on the Organization of the Federal Department for Defence, Civil Protection and Sports of 7 March 2003, entry into force on 1 July 2005, § 152.
Switzerland’s Military Criminal Code (1927), taking into account amendments entered into force up to 2011, states:
Chapter 6bis – War crimes
Art. 110
Articles 112–114 [listing a number of violations of IHL, in addition to those under Art. 111] apply in the context of international armed conflicts, including in situations of occupation, and, if the nature of the offence does not exclude it, in the context of non-international armed conflicts.
Art. 111
1 The penalty shall be a custodial sentence of not less than five years for any person who commits, in the context of an international armed conflict, a grave breach of the Geneva Conventions of 12 August 1949, namely one of the following acts against persons or objects protected under one of these Conventions:
2 Acts covered by paragraph 1 committed in the context of a non-international armed conflict are equivalent to grave breaches of international humanitarian law if they are directed against a person or object protected by that law.
Art. 114
1 The penalty shall be a custodial sentence not exceeding three years or a monetary penalty for any person who, in the context of an armed conflict, violates, in a way not repressed by Articles 111–113, a provision of international humanitarian law whose violation is punishable by virtue of customary international law or an international treaty recognized as binding by Switzerland
2 The offence is subject to disciplinary punishment if it is not of much gravity. 
Switzerland, Military Criminal Code, 1927, taking into account amendments entered into force up to 2011, Articles 110, 111(1)–(2) and 114.
[footnotes in original omitted]
Switzerland’s Penal Code (1937), taking into account amendments entered into force up to 2011, states:
Title Twelveter: War Crimes
Art. 264b
Articles 264d–264j [listing a number of violations of IHL, in addition to those under Art. 264c] apply in the context of international armed conflicts, including in situations of occupation, and, if the nature of the offence does not exclude it, in the context of non-international armed conflicts.
Art. 264c
1 The penalty shall be a custodial sentence of not less than five years for any person who commits, in the context of an international armed conflict, a grave breach of the Geneva Conventions of 12 August 1949, namely one of the following acts against persons or objects protected under one of these Conventions:
2 Acts covered by paragraph 1 committed in the context of a non-international armed conflict are equivalent to grave breaches of international humanitarian law if they are directed against a person or object protected by that law.
Art. 264j
The penalty shall be a custodial sentence not exceeding three years or a monetary penalty for any person who, in the context of an armed conflict, violates, in a way not repressed by Articles 264c–264i, a provision of international humanitarian law whose violation is punishable by virtue of customary international law or an international treaty recognized as binding by Switzerland. 
Switzerland, Penal Code, 1937, taking into account amendments entered into force up to 2011, Articles 264b–c and j.
[footnotes in original omitted]
In 2005, in a report in response to a parliamentary postulate on private security and military companies, Switzerland’s Federal Council stated that “[a]cts which constitute an offence that are of potential relevance for private security companies operating in conflict situations include war crimes” and noted that “war crimes are criminal violations of international humanitarian law such as the torture of prisoners in relation to an armed conflict, the killing of unarmed civilians and the plundering of objects of value”. 
Switzerland, Report by the Swiss Federal Council on Private Security and Military Companies, 2 December 2005, Section 5.5.2.2, p. 49, with footnote 112.
Switzerland’s ABC of International Humanitarian Law (2009) states: “War crimes are grave breaches of the provisions of the Geneva Conventions of 1949 protecting persons and objects as well as other serious violations of the laws and customs that apply to an international or non-international Armed conflict.” 
Switzerland, Federal Department of Foreign Affairs, ABC of International Humanitarian Law, 2009, p. 40.