Соответствующая норма
Switzerland
Practice Relating to Rule 136. Recruitment of Child Soldiers
Switzerland’s Military Criminal Code (1927), taking into account amendments entered into force up to 2011, states in a chapter entitled “War crimes”:
Art. 110
Articles 112–114 apply in the context of international armed conflicts, including in situations of occupation, and, if the nature of the offence does not exclude it, in the context of non-international armed conflicts.
Art. 112b
1 The penalty shall be a custodial sentence of not less than three years for any person who conscripts or enlists children under the age of fifteen years into the armed forces or into armed groups or makes them participate in an armed conflict. 
Switzerland, Military Criminal Code, 1927, taking into account amendments entered into force up to 2011, Articles 110 and 112b (1).
Switzerland’s Penal Code (1937), taking into account amendments entered into force up to 2011, states under the title “War crimes”:
Art. 264b
Articles 264d–264j apply in the context of international armed conflicts, including in situations of occupation, and, if the nature of the offence does not exclude it, in the context of non-international armed conflicts.
Art. 264f
1 The penalty shall be a custodial sentence of not less than three years for any person who conscripts or enlists children under the age of fifteen years into the armed forces or into armed groups or makes them participate in an armed conflict. 
Switzerland, Penal Code, 1937, taking into account amendments entered into force up to 2011, Articles 264b and 264f (1).
At the 27th International Conference of the Red Cross and Red Crescent in 1999, Switzerland pledged “to promote the adoption of national and international standards prohibiting the military recruitment … in armed conflicts of persons under 18 years of age”. 
Switzerland, Pledge made at the 27th International Conference of the Red Cross and Red Crescent, Geneva, 31 October–6 November 1999.
In 2002, upon ratification of the 2000 Optional Protocol on the Involvement of Children in Armed Conflict, Switzerland made the following declaration: “The Swiss Government declares, in accordance with article 3, paragraph 2, of the Optional Protocol, that the minimum age for the recruitment of volunteers into its national armed forces is 18 years. That age is specified by the Swiss legal system.” 
Switzerland, Declaration made upon ratification of the 2000 Optional Protocol on the Involvement of Children in Armed Conflict, 26 June 2002.
In 2004, in its initial report to the Committee on the Rights of the Child under the Optional Protocol on the Involvement of Children in Armed Conflict, Switzerland stated that “[t]he recruitment of children has been generally prohibited in Switzerland”. 
Switzerland, Initial report to the Committee on the Rights of the Child under the Optional Protocol on the Involvement of Children in Armed Conflict, 15 July 2005, UN Doc. CRC/C/OPAC/CHE/1, submitted 28 July 2004, § 4.
Switzerland also stated: “In Switzerland, minors are protected by domestic law, which prohibits both compulsory and voluntary enlistment of children.” 
Switzerland, Initial report to the Committee on the Rights of the Child under the Optional Protocol on the Involvement of Children in Armed Conflict, 15 July 2005, UN Doc. CRC/C/OPAC/CHE/1, submitted 28 July 2004, § 18; see also § 31.
Switzerland further stated:
35. Armed groups engaging in recruitment in Switzerland within the meaning of the Protocol would be covered by article 271 of the Swiss Criminal Code, which states that any person engaging on Swiss territory, without authorization and on behalf of a foreign State, in acts that are the prerogative of the Government shall be liable to ordinary imprisonment or, in serious cases, rigorous imprisonment (para. 1). Similar acts carried out on behalf of a foreign political party or other foreign organization are also punishable (para. 2). … Articles 180 ff. of the Criminal Code, which cover crimes and offences against liberty of the person, would also cover cases of forced recruitment. In cases of abduction, inter alia (Criminal Code, art. 183), children would be protected by a special provision making the perpetrator liable to punishment even where the victim consented. Thus anyone recruiting children against their will and using them in an armed conflict would be guilty of a violation of articles 180 ff. of the Criminal Code. Articles 299 and 300 of the Code, on violation of foreign sovereign territory and acts of hostility against a foreign belligerent or troops, would also cover acts aimed at violent disruption of the political order of a foreign State from within Swiss territory. Consequently, they would also be applicable to groups recruiting children in Switzerland for armed conflict abroad.
36. Various provisions of the Military Criminal Code may also be applicable, in particular article 109, which establishes penalties for anyone violating international conventions on the conduct of warfare or the protection of persons and property, or who violates other recognized laws and practices of war. Article 109 also applies to civilians (Military Criminal Code, art. 2, para. 9), albeit only in time of war. The Military Criminal Code also contains provisions modelled on the provisions of the Criminal Code mentioned above, and which could thus be applied in certain cases to recruitment in Switzerland. Although the Military Criminal Code does not include any provision analogous to article 271 of the Criminal Code, nevertheless, under article 7 of the Military Criminal Code, anyone subject to military criminal law also remains subject to ordinary criminal law for offences not covered by the Military Criminal Code.
37. In cases where children are recruited and used in hostilities within Switzerland by Swiss armed groups, the [1977] second Additional Protocol to the Geneva Conventions would cover children up to 15 years of age. Such an act would also – regardless of the age of the enlisted person – be covered by the criminal provisions of titles 12 and 13 of the Criminal Code (crimes or offences against public order and crimes or offences against the State and national defence, respectively), and in particular articles 260 (riot), 265 (high treason), 266 (offences against the independence of the Confederation), and 275 (offences against the Constitution); and also by the provisions of title 1 of the Criminal Code (crimes and offences against life or physical integrity). However, the criminal justice authorities have never encountered criminal recruitment or other such acts by armed groups, and Switzerland has no information or indication that armed groups or foreign States are recruiting children on Swiss territory in violation of article 271 of the Criminal Code. 
Switzerland, Initial report to the Committee on the Rights of the Child under the Optional Protocol on the Involvement of Children in Armed Conflict, 15 July 2005, UN Doc. CRC/C/OPAC/CHE/1, submitted 28 July 2004, §§ 35–37.
[footnotes omitted]
Switzerland’s Protection of Civilians in Armed Conflict Strategy (2009) states: “The rights and needs of children in armed conflicts are also inadequately taken into account and respected. For example, thousands of children are still being abducted, recruited or forced to participate in hostilities.” 
Switzerland, Federal Department of Foreign Affairs, Protection of Civilians in Armed Conflict Strategy, 2009, p. 3.
Switzerland’s ABC of International Humanitarian Law (2009) states:
Child soldiers
It is estimated that there are around 300,000 child soldiers in the world today. Some are recruited by force while others are volunteers, in some cases for ideological reasons and in others just as a way of obtaining food. The Optional Protocol of 2000 to the [1989] UN Convention on the Rights of the Child provides for measures to ensure the reintegration in society of children who have served as combatants. The Protocol completes and strengthens the provisions of the two [1977] Additional Protocols, prohibiting compulsory recruitment and direct participation in hostilities before the age of 18. Furthermore, it calls on the States Parties to adopt measures to prevent armed groups from recruiting persons below the age of 18 and from deploying them in combat operations. The recruitment of children below the age of 15 in armed forces or other armed groups is regarded as a War crime.
War crimes
War crimes are grave breaches of the provisions of the Geneva Conventions of 1949 protecting persons and objects as well as other serious violations of the laws and customs that apply to an international or non-international Armed conflict. War crimes include notably: … the recruitment of children in armed forces[.] 
Switzerland, Federal Department of Foreign Affairs, ABC of International Humanitarian Law, 2009, pp. 10–11 and 40.
In 2012, in its combined second, third and fourth periodic reports to the Committee on the Rights of the Child, Switzerland stated:
529. As indicated above in relation to article 38 of the Convention, articles 7 and 11 of the Armed Forces Act have been revised. The minimum age for recruitment remains 19; however, those who wish to start earlier for personal reasons may enter recruit school from their eighteenth birthday.
530. The decision made in 2002 to raise to 18 the age at which soldiers may be voluntarily recruited remains in force. There are no plans to change it.
531. Since there are no armed groups active in Swiss territory, there are also no children enlisted in such groups. The legal provisions mentioned in the initial report that would be applied in the event of a violation of the Optional Protocol have not been amended.
534. … Switzerland attaches particular importance to protecting and assisting children during armed conflicts, preventing their enlistment, and also demobilizing and reintegrating child soldiers.
537. The revised version of the laws implementing the [1998] Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court, which entered into force on 1 January 2011, establishes that the offence of “recruitment or use of child soldiers” is a war crime under the Criminal Code and the Military Criminal Code. The provision punishes anyone who conscripts or enlists children under 15 into the armed forces or armed groups or makes them participate in armed conflict.  
Switzerland, Combined second, third and fourth periodic reports to the Committee on the Rights of the Child, 30 October 2013, UN Doc. CRC/C/CHE/2-4, submitted 19 July 2012, pp. 116–118.
[footnotes in original omitted]
In 2012, in a statement before the UN Security Council during a debate on children and armed conflict, the permanent representative of Switzerland stated:
[T]he situation of children affected by armed conflict remains alarming on a global scale. Children continue to be killed and maimed, recruited by armed groups, victimized by sexual violence and denied humanitarian access. In order to strengthen the protection of children affected by armed conflicts, the two remaining grave violations, namely abduction and denial of humanitarian assistance to children, should also be included as trigger violations. Further, Switzerland encourages States who have not yet done so to ratify the [2000] Optional Protocol on the involvement of children in armed conflict. 
Switzerland, Statement by the permanent representative of Switzerland before the UN Security Council during a debate on children and armed conflict, 19 September 2012.
In 2013, Switzerland’s Federal Department of Foreign Affairs issued the “Strategy on the protection of civilians in armed conflicts”, which stated that Switzerland “supports projects pertaining to prevention of recruitment of children by parties to a conflict and reintegration of those who have been demobilized”. 
Switzerland, Federal Department of Foreign Affairs, Strategy on the protection of civilians in armed conflicts, 2013, p. 17.