Соответствующая норма
Canada
Practice Relating to Rule 86. Blinding Laser Weapons
Canada’s LOAC Manual (1999) states: “Laser weapons specifically designed, as their sole combat function or one of their combat functions, to cause permanent blindness to unenhanced vision (i.e., the naked eye or to the eye with corrective eyesight devices) are prohibited.” 
Canada, The Law of Armed Conflict at the Operational and Tactical Level, Office of the Judge Advocate General, 1999, p. 5-3, § 28.
Canada’s LOAC Manual (2001) states in its chapter entitled “Restrictions on the use of weapons”:
1. Laser weapons specifically designed, as their sole combat function or as one of their combat functions, to cause permanent blindness to unenhanced vision (that is, to the naked eye or to the eye with corrective eyesight devices) are prohibited.
2. “Permanent blindness” means irreversible and uncorrectable loss of vision that is seriously disabling with no prospect of recovery. Serious disability is equivalent to visual acuity of less than 20/200 vision. 
Canada, The Law of Armed Conflict at the Operational and Tactical Levels, Office of the Judge Advocate General, 13 August 2001, § 519.1–2.
Upon acceptance of the 1995 Protocol IV to the Convention on Certain Conventional Weapons, Canada stated: “The provisions of … Protocol [IV] which by their contents or nature may also be applied in peacetime, shall be observed at all times.” 
Canada, Declaration made upon acceptance of Protocol IV to the Convention on Certain Conventional Weapons, 25 June 1998.
Canada’s LOAC Manual (1999) states:
Blinding as an incidental or collateral effect of the legitimate military employment of laser systems is not covered by the prohibition [on blinding laser weapons]. For example, the legitimate use of a laser targeting system in a tank is lawful even if one of its collateral effects may be to cause blindness. However, such a laser targeting system could not be deliberately used to blind enemy combatants. 
Canada, The Law of Armed Conflict at the Operational and Tactical Level, Office of the Judge Advocate General, 1999, p. 5-3, § 30.
Canada’s LOAC Manual (2001) states in its chapter entitled “Restrictions on the use of weapons”:
Blinding as an incidental or collateral effect of the legitimate military employment of laser systems is not covered by the prohibition [on blinding laser weapons]. For example, the legitimate use of a laser targeting system in a tank is lawful even if one of its collateral effects may be to cause blindness. However, such a laser targeting system could not be deliberately used to blind enemy combatants. 
Canada, The Law of Armed Conflict at the Operational and Tactical Levels, Office of the Judge Advocate General, 13 August 2001, § 519.3.