Соответствующая норма
Canada
Practice Relating to Rule 51. Public and Private Property in Occupied Territory
Section C. Private property in occupied territory
Canada’s LOAC Manual (1999) states: “Enemy private movable property, other than arms and military papers captured or found on a battlefield, may be appropriated only to the extent such taking is permissible in an occupied area.” 
Canada, The Law of Armed Conflict at the Operational and Tactical Level, Office of the Judge Advocate General, 1999, p. 6-5, § 49.
The manual further provides, with respect to occupied territory:
Private property may not be confiscated.
The seizure of private movable property is governed by the [1907 Hague Regulations]. All appliances adapted for the transmission of news or for the transport of persons or goods by land, sea or air, stores of arms and in general every kind of war material, even if they belong to private individuals, may be seized. If seized, however, they must be restored and the indemnity fixed when peace is made.
These objects may be seized by, but they do not become the property of, the occupant. The seizure merely acts as a transfer of the possession of the object to the occupant while the ownership remains in the private owner.
Insofar as the objects seized are capable of physical restoration they must be restored at the conclusion of peace, and insofar as they have been consumed or have been destroyed or have perished a cash indemnity must be paid when peace is made.
No provision in the [1907 Hague Regulations] obliges the belligerent who effects the seizure to give a receipt, or to carry out the seizure in any formal manner, but the fact of seizure should obviously be established in some way, if only to give the owner an opportunity of claiming the compensation expressly provided for.
Requisition may be made of all commodities necessary for the maintenance of the occupying army. This includes: food and supplies, liquor and tobacco, cloth for uniforms, leather for boots, and the like. The taking of such articles is forbidden unless they are actually required for the needs of the occupying army. Even if foodstuffs, goods or medical supplies available in the occupied territory are subject to requisition because they are needed for the forces of occupation and for administrative personnel, they may be requisitioned only after the requirements of the civilian population have been taken into account. In any case, the articles taken must be duly requisitioned, and the amount taken must be in proportion to the resources of the country.
Articles requisitioned should be paid for in ready money, but if this is not possible a receipt must be given and payment of the amount due must be made as soon as possible. Articles properly requisitioned become the property of the occupant and pass out of the ownership of their former owner.
Requisitions of supplies may be made in bulk, that is, a community may be called upon to supply certain quantities, or a return may be called for from inhabitants giving the amount in their possession of which a proportion may then be requisitioned, or the householders may be requisitioned to feed or partly feed the soldiers quartered on them. In fact, any way that is convenient may be employed provided that the above-mentioned rules and the provisions of [the 1949 Geneva Convention IV] are observed.
The right to billet troops on the inhabitants follows from the right to requisition. 
Canada, The Law of Armed Conflict at the Operational and Tactical Level, Office of the Judge Advocate General, 1999, pp. 12-8 and 12-9, §§ 69–77.
Canada’s Code of Conduct (2001) states:
[Respecting civilian property] is one important difference between a disciplined professional force and a band of marauders. Respect for the property rights of civilians, including civilians in the territory of the opposing force, requires discipline. If you do not obey this rule, the civilian population may turn against you. The mission may thus be jeopardised and the conflict prolonged.
You must make every effort to avoid alienating the local civilian population. Reckless destruction of civilian property and disregard for personal ownership rights will place the overall military mission at risk as well as damage the reputation of Canada and its soldiers …
The CF [Canadian Forces] may purchase or requisition property and services from the local population but only for the use of our forces. Requisitioned material should always be paid for in cash, or a receipt should be provided which then should be honoured as soon as possible. Where requisitioning is authorized, appropriate procedures will be established and published. 
Canada, Code of Conduct for CF Personnel, Office of the Judge Advocate General, 4 June 2001, Rule 4, §§ 4–6.
Canada’s LOAC Manual (2001) states in its chapter on land warfare: “Enemy private movable property, other than arms and military papers captured or found on a battlefield, may be appropriated only to the extent such taking is permissible in an occupied area.” 
Canada, The Law of Armed Conflict at the Operational and Tactical Levels, Office of the Judge Advocate General, 13 August 2001, § 623.
In its chapter on rights and duties of occupying powers, the manual states:
1238. Confiscation
1. Confiscation is the taking of enemy public movable property without the obligation to compensate the state to which it belongs. All enemy public movable property which may be usable for military operations may be confiscated. Private property may not be confiscated. Enemy public immovable property may be administered and used but it may not be confiscated.
1239. Seizure
1. The seizure of private movable property is governed by the [1907 Hague Regulations]. All appliances adapted for the transmission of news or for the transport of persons or goods by land, sea or air, stores of arms and in general every kind of war material, even if they belong to private individuals, may be seized. If seized, however, they must be restored and the indemnity fixed when peace is made.
2. These objects may be seized by, but they do not become the property of, the occupant. The seizure merely acts as a transfer of the possession of the object to the occupant while the ownership remains in the private owner.
3. Insofar as the objects seized are capable of physical restoration they must be restored at the conclusion of peace, and insofar as they have been consumed or have been destroyed or have perished, a cash indemnity must be paid when peace is made.
4. No provision in the [1907 Hague Regulations] obliges the belligerent who effects the seizure to give a receipt, or to carry out the seizure in any formal manner, but the fact of seizure should obviously be established in some way, if only to give the owner an opportunity of claiming the compensation expressly provided for.
1240. Requisition
1. Requisition may be made of all commodities necessary for the maintenance of the occupying army. This includes: food and fuel supplies, liquor and tobacco, cloth for uniforms, leather for boots, and the like. The taking of such articles is forbidden unless they are actually required for the needs of the occupying army. Even if foodstuffs, goods or medical supplies available in the occupied territory are subject to requisition because they are needed for the forces of occupation and for administrative personnel, they may be requisitioned only after the requirements of the civilian population have been taken into account. In any case, the articles taken must be duly requisitioned, and the amount taken must be in proportion to the resources of the country.
2. Articles requisitioned should be paid for in ready money, but if this is not possible a receipt must be given for them and payment of the amount due must be made as soon as possible. Articles properly requisitioned become the property of the occupant and pass out of the ownership of their former owner.
3. Requisitions of supplies may be made in bulk. A community may be called upon to supply certain quantities, or a return may be called for from inhabitants giving the amounts in their possession of which a proportion may then be requisitioned, or the householders may be requisitioned to feed or partly feed the soldiers quartered on them. In fact, any way that is convenient may be employed provided that the abovementioned rules and the provisions of [the 1949 Geneva Convention IV] are observed.
4. The right to billet troops on the inhabitants follows from the right to requisition. 
Canada, The Law of Armed Conflict at the Operational and Tactical Levels, Office of the Judge Advocate General, 13 August 2001, §§ 1238–1240.
Rule 4 of Canada’s Code of Conduct (2005) instructs Canadian Forces (CF) personnel: “Treat all civilians humanely and respect civilian property.” 
Canada, Code of Conduct for CF Personnel, Office of the Judge Advocate General, 2005, Rule 4.
The Code of Conduct further explains:
1. Rule # 4 deals with the protection of civilians in the theatre of operations … Their property must also be respected. In general, civilians should be treated the way you would like you and your family to be treated in the same circumstances.
4. Compliance with rule #4 is one important difference between a disciplined professional force and a band of marauders. Respect for the property rights of civilians, including civilians in the territory of the opposing force, requires discipline. If you do not obey this rule, the civilian population may turn against you. The mission may thus be jeopardised and the conflict prolonged.
5. You must make every effort to avoid alienating the local civilian population. Reckless destruction of civilian property and disregard for personal ownership rights will place the overall military mission at risk as well as damage the reputation of Canada and its soldiers. Military necessity may sometimes require the destruction of some civilian property in order to conduct operations. This destruction should not be done needlessly. The wanton destruction, theft or confiscation of civilian property is prohibited and is an offence under the Code of Service Discipline.
6. The CF may purchase or requisition property and services from the local population but only for the use of our forces. Requisitioned material should always be paid for in cash, or a receipt should be provided which then should be honoured as soon as possible. Where requisitioning is authorized, appropriate procedures will be established and published. 
Canada, Code of Conduct for CF Personnel, Office of the Judge Advocate General, 2005, Rule 4, §§ 1 and 4–6.
Canada’s National Defence Act (1985) punishes “every person who … commits any offence against the property … of any inhabitant or resident of a country in which he is serving”. 
Canada, National Defence Act, 1985, Section 77(f).