Соответствующая норма
Canada
Practice Relating to Rule 35. Hospital and Safety Zones and Neutralized Zones
Canada’s LOAC Manual (1999) describes hospital and safety zones and neutralized zones as areas that are entitled to protection from attack under the laws of armed conflict. 
Canada, The Law of Armed Conflict at the Operational and Tactical Level, Office of the Judge Advocate General, 1999, pp. 4-10 and 4-11, §§ 102, 106 and 108.
The manual states: “Such zones also protect those personnel responsible for organizing and administrating the zones as well as those caring for the wounded and sick.” It adds: “Hospital zones should be located in sparsely populated areas away from legitimate targets.” 
Canada, The Law of Armed Conflict at the Operational and Tactical Level, Office of the Judge Advocate General, 1999, p. 11-2, § 14.
The manual provides that hospital and safety zones can be established either in time of peace or after the outbreak of hostilities, and even in occupied areas if necessary. 
Canada, The Law of Armed Conflict at the Operational and Tactical Level, Office of the Judge Advocate General, 1999, p. 4-10, §§ 103–104.
As regards neutralized zones, the manual states:
Any party to a conflict may, either directly or through a neutral State or some humanitarian organization, propose to the adverse party to establish, in the regions where the fighting is taking place, neutralized zones intended to shelter from the effects of the conflict the following persons, without distinction: wounded and sick combatants or non-combatants, and civilian persons who take no part in hostilities and who, while they reside in the zones, perform no work of a military character. 
Canada, The Law of Armed Conflict at the Operational and Tactical Level, Office of the Judge Advocate General, 1999, p. 4-10, § 107.
The manual further states that any agreement setting up a neutralized zone “should provide details of the location, administration, provisioning and supervision of the proposed neutralized zone as well as fix its beginning and duration”. 
Canada, The Law of Armed Conflict at the Operational and Tactical Level, Office of the Judge Advocate General, 1999, p. 11-2, § 14.
Canada’s LOAC Manual (2001) states in its chapter on targeting:
453. Scope
1. This section describes a number of areas that are entitled to protection from attack under the LOAC.
454. Hospital and safety zones
1. Hospital and safety zones can be established by parties to a conflict to protect the following persons from the effects of armed conflict:
a. wounded, sick and aged persons;
b. children under the age of fifteen;
c. expectant mothers; and
d. mothers of children under the age of seven.
2. Such zones also protect those personnel responsible for organizing and administering the zones as well as those caring for the wounded and sick.
3. Hospital zones should be located in sparsely populated areas away from legitimate targets. They shall be marked with a distinctive sign consisting of an oblique red band on a white background. Zones reserved exclusively for the wounded and sick may be marked by means of the Red Cross or the Red Crescent …
4. Hospital and safety zones are not to be attacked.
455. Neutralized zones
1. Any party to a conflict may, either directly or through a neutral state or some humanitarian organization, propose to the adverse party to establish, in the regions where the fighting is taking place, neutralized zones intended to shelter from the effects of the conflict the following persons, without distinction:
a. wounded and sick combatants or non-combatants; and
b. civilian persons who take no part in hostilities and who, while they reside in the zones, perform no work of a military character.
2. So long as the adverse party complies with the terms of the agreement establishing the neutralized zone, it shall not be attacked. 
Canada, The Law of Armed Conflict at the Operational and Tactical Levels, Office of the Judge Advocate General, 13 August 2001, §§ 453, 454.2–4 and 455.
In its chapter on the treatment of the wounded, sick and shipwrecked, the manual states:
In regard to permanent medical installations on land, parties may, in peace or after hostilities have commenced, establish in their own and in occupied territory, hospital zones or localities to protect the wounded and sick from war risks. During hostilities parties to a conflict may enter into agreements for the recognition of such zones and localities. 
Canada, The Law of Armed Conflict at the Operational and Tactical Levels, Office of the Judge Advocate General, 13 August 2001, § 923.
In its chapter entitled “Treatment of civilians in the hands of a party to the conflict or an occupying power”, the manual states:
1108. Hospital and safety zones
1. Hospital and safety zones and localities may be established either in time of peace or after the outbreak of hostilities. Belligerents may establish such zones and localities in their own territory and, if necessary, in occupied areas for the protection from the effects of war of wounded, sick and aged persons, children under fifteen, expectant mothers and mothers of children under seven. To facilitate the institution and recognition of hospital and safety zones, recourse may be had to the good offices of the Protecting Powers and the ICRC.
1109. Neutralized zones
1. Any belligerent may agree in writing with the opposing force to the establishment in the regions where fighting is going on of neutralized zones, in order to shelter wounded or sick combatants or non-combatants and civilian persons who take no part in hostilities and who perform no work of a military character. The agreement should provide details of the location, administration, provisioning and supervision of the proposed neutralized zone as well as fix its beginning and duration. 
Canada, The Law of Armed Conflict at the Operational and Tactical Levels, Office of the Judge Advocate General, 13 August 2001, §§ 1108–1109.
In its chapter entitled “Communications and contact between opposing forces”, the manual further states:
1403. Agreements
1. Any agreement made by belligerent commanders must be adhered to, and any breach of its conditions would involve international responsibility if ordered by a government, and personal liability, (which might amount to a war crime) if committed by an individual on his or her own authority. The terms of any agreement should be clear and precise and carefully explained to the troops affected by it. Whenever possible it should be reduced to writing.
1407. Special zones
1. Agreements may also be made between the belligerents for particular areas to be placed, either on a permanent or temporary basis, outside of the zone of operations. Such arrangements may be made directly or through the good offices of a neutral power of the protecting power. These agreements may be concerned with the establishment of safety zones, neutralized zones, exclusion zones, open cities and undefended places. 
Canada, The Law of Armed Conflict at the Operational and Tactical Levels, Office of the Judge Advocate General, 13 August 2001, §§ 1403.1 and 1407.1.