Соответствующая норма
Canada
Practice Relating to Rule 34. Journalists
Canada’s LOAC Manual (1999) states:
Journalists engaged in dangerous professional missions in areas of armed conflict shall be considered civilians. As such, they are non-combatants and may not be attacked. Should a journalist be detained, such journalist’s status will be that of a civilian. 
Canada, The Law of Armed Conflict at the Operational and Tactical Level, Office of the Judge Advocate General, 1999, p. 3-3, § 23; see also p. 4-7, § 61.
Canada’s LOAC Manual (2001) states in its chapter entitled “Combatant Status”:
Journalists engaged in dangerous professional missions in areas of armed conflict shall be considered civilians. As such, they are non-combatants and may not be attacked. Should a journalist be detained, such journalist’s status will be that of a civilian. 
Canada, The Law of Armed Conflict at the Operational and Tactical Levels, Office of the Judge Advocate General, 13 August 2001, § 313.
The manual further states: “Journalists who are authorized to accompany the armed forces are ‘war correspondents.’ They are non-combatants but risk being attacked as part of a legitimate target. War correspondents who are captured by the enemy are PWs [prisoners of war].” 
Canada, The Law of Armed Conflict at the Operational and Tactical Levels, Office of the Judge Advocate General, 13 August 2001, § 314.
In its chapter on targeting, the manual also states:
Journalists engaged in dangerous professional missions in areas of armed conflict shall be considered as civilians and are entitled to the protection accorded to civilians under the LOAC, provided they take no action adversely affecting their status as civilians. Such journalists must possess identity cards that attest to their status as journalists. 
Canada, The Law of Armed Conflict at the Operational and Tactical Levels, Office of the Judge Advocate General, 13 August 2001, § 441.
In 2013, in a statement before the UN Security Council during an open debate on the protection of civilians in armed conflict, the minister counsellor of the Permanent Mission of Canada stated: “We condemn the targeting of journalists, media professionals and associated personnel … We must continue to work to bring the perpetrators of such heinous acts to justice. Those who deliberately target civilians with violence must be held to account.” 
Canada, Statement by the minister counsellor of the Permanent Mission of Canada during a UN Security Council open debate on the protection of civilians in armed conflict, 17 July 2013.