Соответствующая норма
Canada
Practice Relating to Rule 104. Respect for Convictions and Religious Practices
Canada’s LOAC Manual (1999) provides that, in the territories of the parties to the conflict and in occupied territories, “religious conventions and practices … of protected persons must in all circumstances be respected”. 
Canada, The Law of Armed Conflict at the Operational and Tactical Level, Office of the Judge Advocate General, 1999, p. 11-4, § 29; see also p. 12-4, § 37 (occupied territory).
It further provides that “the occupant is obligated to allow freedom of religion in the occupied territory”. 
Canada, The Law of Armed Conflict at the Operational and Tactical Level, Office of the Judge Advocate General, 1999, p. 12-3, § 28.
According to the manual, “it is a duty of the occupant to see that religious convictions [of inhabitants of occupied territory] are not interfered with”. 
Canada, The Law of Armed Conflict at the Operational and Tactical Level, Office of the Judge Advocate General, 1999, p. 12-5, § 36.
With respect to non-international armed conflicts, the manual states: “All persons not participating in the conflict or who have ceased to do so are entitled to … respect for their convictions and religious practices”. 
Canada, The Law of Armed Conflict at the Operational and Tactical Level, Office of the Judge Advocate General, 1999, p. 17-3, § 19.
Canada’s Code of Conduct (2001) states: “Civilians [in a foreign land] are entitled in all circumstances to respect for … their religious convictions and practices, and their manners and customs.” 
Canada, Code of Conduct for CF Personnel, Office of the Judge Advocate General, 4 June 2001, Rule 4, § 2.
Canada’s LOAC Manual (2001), in its chapter on the treatment of civilians in the hands of a party to the conflict or an occupying power and, more specifically, in a section entitled “Provisions common to the territories of the parties to the conflict and to occupied territories”, states: “The person, honour, family rights, religious conventions and practices, and manners and customs of protected persons must in all circumstances be respected.” 
Canada, The Law of Armed Conflict at the Operational and Tactical Levels, Office of the Judge Advocate General, 13 August 2001, § 1118.
In the same chapter, in a section entitled “Aliens in the territory of a party to the conflict”, the manual states:
Subject to security requirements protected persons who remain in the territory of the belligerent must, in general, be treated in accordance with the rules governing the treatment of aliens in time of peace. In particular, they must be allowed to … practice their religion. 
Canada, The Law of Armed Conflict at the Operational and Tactical Levels, Office of the Judge Advocate General, 13 August 2001, § 1123.
In the same chapter, in a section entitled “Treatment of internees”, the manual further states:
5. … Premises for the holding of religious services must be made available …
6. … [Internees] shall enjoy complete freedom to practice their own religion. 
Canada, The Law of Armed Conflict at the Operational and Tactical Levels, Office of the Judge Advocate General, 13 August 2001, § 1129.5–6.
In its chapter on rights and duties of occupying powers, the manual also states:
1216. Freedom of Religion
1. The occupant is obligated to allow freedom of religion in the occupied territory. However, the clergy are obligated to refrain from reference to politics and are liable to appropriate sanctions if they use their position to incite resistance.
1222. Rights of Inhabitants of Occupied Territory
1. It is the duty of the occupant to see that the lives of the inhabitants are respected … [and that] their religious convictions are not interfered with …
2. In all circumstances … protected persons are entitled to respect for their … religious conventions and practices. 
Canada, The Law of Armed Conflict at the Operational and Tactical Levels, Office of the Judge Advocate General, 13 August 2001, §§ 1216.1 and 1222.
In its chapter on non-international armed conflicts, the manual states:
[The 1977 Additional Protocol II] provides that all persons not participating in the conflict or who have ceased to do so are entitled, whether under restriction or not, to respect for their persons, honour and convictions, and religious practices, and are, in all circumstances, to be treated humanely and without adverse distinction. 
Canada, The Law of Armed Conflict at the Operational and Tactical Levels, Office of the Judge Advocate General, 13 August 2001, § 1711.2.
Rule 4 of Canada’s Code of Conduct (2005) instructs Canadian Forces (CF) personnel: “Treat all civilians humanely and respect civilian property”. 
Canada, Code of Conduct for CF Personnel, Office of the Judge Advocate General, 2005, Rule 4.
The Code of Conduct further explains:
Military operations in foreign lands expose CF personnel to civilian populations that differ markedly from our own. However different or unusual a foreign land may appear, these civilians are in all circumstances entitled to respect for their persons and property, their honour, their family rights, their religious convictions and practices, and their manners and customs. In your daily interaction with the civilian population, they must at all times be humanely treated and shall not be subjected to acts of violence, threats, or insults. Women and children in particular must not be subjected to rape, enforced prostitution, and any form of indecent assault. All civilians, subject to favourable considerations based on sex, health or age, must be treated with the same consideration and without any adverse distinction based in particular on race, religion or political opinion. 
Canada, Code of Conduct for CF Personnel, Office of the Judge Advocate General, 2005, Rule 4, § 2.
In 2011, in a statement before the UN Security Council during a meeting on the protection of civilians in armed conflict, the deputy permanent representative of Canada stated: “[W]e must vigorously defend the rights of vulnerable religious minorities in situations of armed conflict who are persecuted for their religious beliefs.” 
Canada, Statement by the deputy permanent representative of Canada during a UN Security Council meeting on the protection of civilians in armed conflict, 9 November 2011.
In 2012, in a statement before the UN Security Council during an open debate on the protection of civilians in armed conflict, the permanent representative of Canada stated: “[W]e must take action to defend the rights of vulnerable religious minorities in situations of armed conflict who are persecuted for their beliefs.” 
Canada, Statement by the permanent representative of Canada during a UN Security Council open debate on the protection of civilians in armed conflict, 25 June 2012.
In 2013, in a statement before the UN Security Council during an open debate on the protection of civilians in armed conflict, the deputy permanent representative of Canada stated: “We must take action to defend the rights of vulnerable religious minorities in situations of armed conflict who are persecuted for their beliefs.” 
Canada, Statement by the deputy permanent representative of Canada during a UN Security Council open debate on the protection of civilians in armed conflict, 12 February 2013.
In 2013, in a statement before the UN Security Council during open debate on the protection of civilians in armed conflict, the permanent representative of Canada stated:
We must take action to defend the rights of vulnerable religious communities in situations of armed conflict who are persecuted for their beliefs. In this regard, we strongly encourage UN agencies to better take into account the needs of persecuted religious communities, including members of the Christian community, who have been targets of persecution and forced to flee from conflicts in the Middle East. 
Canada, Statement by the permanent representative of Canada during a UN Security Council open debate on the protection of civilians in armed conflict, 19 August 2013, p. 1.