Brazil
Practice Relating to Nuclear Weapons
Brazil’s Operations Manual for the Evacuation of Non-Combatants (2007) states in a chapter on “Brazil and its Foreign Policy”:
2.5 Brazil’s support for the principles of peaceful settlement of disputes, non-intervention and protection of peace requires strengthening and universalizing the international regimes for disarmament and non-proliferation. Brazil makes every effort in support for the objective set out by the international community of achieving the complete elimination of nuclear weapons. Nuclear disarmament and non-proliferation are mutually reinforcing processes and require that continuous and irreversible progress be made towards both objectives. The objective of non-proliferation shall be achieved through the systematic and progressive elimination of nuclear weapons in an extensive, universal, non-discriminatory and verifiable manner.
2.11 Brazil … has signed the [(1968)] Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons and highlights the need for compliance with article VI, which provides for the obligation of nuclear disarmament by the nuclear powers. 
Brazil, Manual de Operações de Evacuação de Não-Combatentes, Ministério da Defesa, Estado-Maior de Defesa, MD33-M-08, Ordinance No. 1351/EMD/MD of 11 October 2007, published in Diário Oficial da União, No. 198, 15 October 2007, §§ 2.5 and 2.11.
In 1996, during a debate in the First Committee of the UN General Assembly, Brazil stated:
Nuclear weapons diminish the security of all States, including the States that possess them. They have no military utility other than that of deterring a comparably equipped opponent from using them. The continuation of the present situation, however, poses intolerable risks. The only way to reduce these risks is a progressive series of steps that would lead to complete elimination of that category of weapons.
In this context it is important to add that the International Court of Justice unanimously determined that there is a legal obligation not only to negotiate in good faith measures for nuclear disarmament in all its aspects, but also to bring those negotiations to a conclusion – that is to say, to eliminate nuclear weapons. The landmark Advisory Opinion of the International Court of Justice constitutes a new term of reference for all the efforts of the international community towards nuclear disarmament. 
Brazil, Statement before the First Committee of the UN General Assembly, UN Doc. A/C.1/51/PV.4, 15 October 1996, p. 5.
In 2005, Brazil’s president adopted the National Defence Policy, which states:
4.7 Brazil supports an international order based on … the prohibition of … nuclear weapons …
4.14 In accordance with the quest for international peace and security, … [Brazil] is a party to the [1968] Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons and highlights the need for compliance with its article VI, which provides for negotiations towards the complete elimination of nuclear weapons by the nuclear powers. 
Brazil, National Defence Policy, approved by decree of the President of the Republic, Decree No. 5.484, 30 June 2005, published in Diário Oficial da União, 1 July 2005, §§ 4.7 and 4.14.
In 2008, Brazil’s president adopted the National Defence Strategy, which states:
Brazil has committed to the strictly peaceful use of nuclear energy, pursuant to [its] Federal Constitution and to [its] adherence to the [1968] Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons …
Due to a constitutional imperative and international treaty, Brazil abstains from employing nuclear energy for any non-peaceful purpose. It does so under several premises, among which the most important is the progressive nuclear disarmament by nuclear powers.
… [Brazil] shall not adhere to protocols to the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons aimed at increasing the restrictions imposed by such treaty while the nuclear powers have not made progress on the central premise of the treaty: their own nuclear disarmament. 
Brazil, National Defence Strategy, approved by decree of the President of the Republic, Decree No. 6.703, 18 December 2008, published in Diário Oficial da União, 19 December 2008, Section I.