Соответствующая норма
Yugoslavia, Socialist Federal Republic of
Practice Relating to Rule 25. Medical Personnel
The Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia’s Military Manual (1988) restates Articles 24–26 of the 1949 Geneva Convention I and extends the protection of military medical personnel to civilian medical personnel. 
Yugoslavia, Socialist Federal Republic of, Propisi o Primeri Pravila Medjunarodnog Ratnog Prava u Oruzanim Snagama SFRJ, PrU-2, Savezni Sekretarijat za Narodnu Odbranu (Pravna Uprava), 1988, §§ 175–178 and 195; see also § 82 (conduct of hostilities).
Under the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia’s Penal Code (1976), as amended in 2001, “murder, torture [or] inhuman treatment” of medical personnel is a war crime. 
Yugoslavia, Socialist Federal Republic of, Penal Code, 1976, as amended in 2001, Article 143.
In 1991, in a document entitled “Examples of violations of the rules of international law committed by the so-called armed forces of Slovenia”, the Ministry of Defence of the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia included as an example the arrest of medical teams even though they were wearing the red cross emblem. 
Yugoslavia, Socialist Federal Republic of, Ministry of Defence, Examples of violations of the rules of international law committed by the so-called armed forces of Slovenia, 10 July 1991, § 1(iii).
The Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia’s Military Manual (1988) provides that military medical personnel may carry light weapons for their self-defence. Such personnel is authorized to engage in armed resistance against enemy armed forces directly and deliberately attacking, in spite of warning, and against marauders. 
Yugoslavia, Socialist Federal Republic of, Propisi o Primeri Pravila Medjunarodnog Ratnog Prava u Oruzanim Snagama SFRJ, PrU-2, Savezni Sekretarijat za Narodnu Odbranu (Pravna Uprava), 1988, §§ 171–172.