Norma relacionada
Colombia
Practice Relating to Rule 161. International Cooperation in Criminal Proceedings
Section E. Cooperation with international criminal tribunals
In 2008, in the Constitutional Case No. C-1156/08, the Plenary Chamber of Colombia’s Constitutional Court was called upon to decide on the constitutionality of the Agreement on the Privileges and Immunities of the International Criminal Court and of the corresponding domestic law approving it. The Court stated:
The privileges and immunities granted to the International Criminal Court as an institution and to its personnel, pursuant to the provisions of the Agreement [on the Privileges and Immunities of the International Criminal Court], are in conformity with the [1991] Constitution inasmuch as it aims to give all guarantees needed for them to develop their functions with independence and neutrality …
Entitlements that are indispensable conditions to allow this high Court to freely meet its objectives without any interference from the countries in which it has to work. The privileges, immunities and benefits granted seek to facilitate the exercise of its activities and the good functioning, efficiency and autonomy of the institution to achieve its objectives.
It is crucial for the ICC and its personnel to have the indispensable guarantees of protection to be able to perform their functions outside of the seat of the Court. …
Therefore, considering the importance of these benefits for the performance of the work of the Court and in light of the principle of cooperation of States Parties with the International Criminal Court (preamble and articles 86 and 87 of the [1998 ICC Statute]), it is possible to conclude that the Agreement is in conformity with the concept of national sovereignty and with the principles of international law accepted by Colombia. 
Colombia, Constitutional Court, Constitutional Case No. C-1156/08, Judgment, 26 November 2008, p. 66.
In 2009, in the Constitutional Case No. C-801/09, the Plenary Chamber of Colombia’s Constitutional Court was called upon to decide on the constitutionality of the 2002 ICC Elements of Crimes, the 2002 ICC Rules of Procedure and Evidence, and the corresponding domestic law approving them. Regarding the cooperation of States Parties with the ICC, the Court stated:
The activities undertaken by national tribunals at the request of the International Criminal Court, within the scope of the international cooperation provided for under the [1998] Rome Statute (articles 88, 89 and 103), must be regulated according to domestic procedures. Therefore, States Parties, such as Colombia, have the duty to adjust their internal procedures to the requirements of this cooperation. 
Colombia, Constitutional Court, Constitutional Case No. C-801/09, Judgment, 10 November 2009, § 5.3.14.
In 1997, during plenary discussions in the UN General Assembly on a report of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY), Colombia stated: “We encourage the international community to cooperate more actively with the [ICTY] so that it can accomplish its task of bringing to justice those who committed atrocities during the war in the former Yugoslavia.” 
Colombia, Statement before the UN General Assembly, UN Doc. A/52/PV.44, 4 November 1997, p. 10.