Norma relacionada
Peru
Practice Relating to Rule 124. ICRC Access to Persons Deprived of Their Liberty
Peru’s IHL Manual (2004) states with regard to substitutes for Protecting Powers: “The International Committee of the Red Cross can carry out the humanitarian activities assigned to it under international humanitarian law with the consent of the parties to the conflict.” 
Peru, Manual de Derecho Internacional Humanitario para las Fuerzas Armadas, Resolución Ministerial Nº 1394-2004-DE/CCFFAA/CDIH-FFAA, Lima, 1 December 2004, § 25.d.(2).(a).
The manual also states: “The [1949] Third Geneva Convention relative to the Treatment of Prisoners of War contains detailed provisions on … the right to communicate with the Protecting Power and the right of the Protecting Power or the International Committee of the Red Cross to visit any place where prisoners of war are being held.” 
Peru, Manual de Derecho Internacional Humanitario para las Fuerzas Armadas, Resolución Ministerial Nº 1394-2004-DE/CCFFAA/CDIH-FFAA, Lima, 1 December 2004, § 56.e.
The manual further states: “The following medical personnel can provide medical services to prisoners of war and civilian internees: … medical personnel of the ICRC.” 
Peru, Manual de Derecho Internacional Humanitario para las Fuerzas Armadas, Resolución Ministerial Nº 1394-2004-DE/CCFFAA/CDIH-FFAA, Lima, 1 December 2004, § 90.a.(4).
In the context of a non-international armed conflict, the manual states: “An impartial humanitarian body, such as the International Committee of the Red Cross, may offer its services to the parties to the conflict.” 
Peru, Manual de Derecho Internacional Humanitario para las Fuerzas Armadas, Resolución Ministerial Nº 1394-2004-DE/CCFFAA/CDIH-FFAA, Lima, 1 December 2004, § 71.b.
Peru’s IHL and Human Rights Manual (2010) states with regard to substitutes for Protecting Powers: “The International Committee of the Red Cross can carry out the humanitarian activities assigned to it under international humanitarian law with the consent of the parties to the conflict.” 
Peru, Manual de Derecho Internacional Humanitario y Derechos Humanos para las Fuerzas Armadas, Resolución Ministerial No. 049-2010/DE/VPD, Lima, 21 May 2010, § 26(d)(2)(a), p. 235.
The manual also states: “The [1949] Third Geneva Convention relative to the Treatment of Prisoners of War contains detailed provisions on … the right to communicate with the Protecting Power and the right of the Protecting Power or the International Committee of the Red Cross to visit any place where prisoners of war are being held.” 
Peru, Manual de Derecho Internacional Humanitario y Derechos Humanos para las Fuerzas Armadas, Resolución Ministerial No. 049-2010/DE/VPD, Lima, 21 May 2010, § 57(e), p. 263.
The manual further states: “The following medical personnel can provide medical services to prisoners of war and civilian internees: … medical personnel of the ICRC.” 
Peru, Manual de Derecho Internacional Humanitario y Derechos Humanos para las Fuerzas Armadas, Resolución Ministerial No. 049-2010/DE/VPD, Lima, 21 May 2010, § 81(a)(4), pp. 675–676.
In the context of a non-international armed conflict, the manual states: “An impartial humanitarian body, such as the International Committee of the Red Cross, may offer its services to the parties to the conflict.” 
Peru, Manual de Derecho Internacional Humanitario y Derechos Humanos para las Fuerzas Armadas, Resolución Ministerial No. 049-2010/DE/VPD, Lima, 21 May 2010, § 72(b), p. 271.
In 2006, during the consideration of the fourth periodic report of Peru before the Committee against Torture, a representative of Peru stated that the Peruvian “Government … [allows] systematic visits by the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) to places of detention, including those where persons convicted of terrorist offences … [are] held.” 
Peru, Statement before the Committee against Torture during the consideration of the fourth periodic report of Peru, 9 May 2006, UN Doc. CAT/C/SR. 697 § 39.