Norma relacionada
Netherlands
Practice Relating to Rule 158. Prosecution of War Crimes
Section B. Granting of asylum to suspected war criminals
In the Ahmed case in 1996, the Administrative Law Division of the Council of State of the Netherlands ruled that a Somali national could not be granted the protection of the 1951 Refugee Convention since he was suspected of having been involved in committing crimes against humanity and, being a high-ranking soldier and acting on behalf of the Somali Government, was thus guilty of acts contrary to common Article 3 of the 1949 Geneva Conventions. 
Netherlands, Council of State (Raad van State), Administrative Law Division, Ahmed case, Judgment, 20 December 1996.
Similar judgments were pronounced by the same body in the Hamoud case and in the Chantirakumar case in 1997. 
Netherlands, Council of State (Raad van State), Administrative Law Division, Hamoud case, Judgment, 11 September 1997; Chantirakumar case, Judgment, 2 September 1997.
The Report on the Practice of the Netherlands, with respect to the 1984 Convention against Torture and its ratification procedure in the Netherlands, and referring to decisions of the Dutch Administrative Law Division of the Council of State to refuse protection under the 1951 Refugee Convention to persons suspected of having been involved in committing crimes against humanity and crimes in violation of common Article 3 of the 1949 Geneva Conventions, states: “The Dutch government completely complied with the treaty requirements.” 
Report on the Practice of the Netherlands, 1997, Chapter 6.4.