Norma relacionada
Guinea
Practice Relating to Rule 131. Treatment of Displaced Persons
Section D. Specific needs of displaced women, children and elderly persons
Guinea’s Children’s Code (2008) states:
Competent Guinean authorities shall take all appropriate measures to ensure that a Child seeking to obtain a refugee status or a Child considered a refugee receives the protection and humanitarian assistance he or she is entitled to irrespective of whether he or she is accompanied by his or her parents, a legal guardian or a next of kin. 
Guinea, Children’s Code, 2008, Article 432.
In 2009, in its second periodic report to the Committee on the Rights of the Child, Guinea stated:
176. More than 80 per cent of separated children are refugees who have been displaced after conflicts broke out in the sub[-]region, in particular in Liberia and Sierra Leone, and following the rebel attacks endured by Guinea in 2000.
182. There is a category of children whose families have not been found despite many years of efforts. The solution in these situations should be in the best interest of the child.
183. A unit has been set up to search for long-term solutions for children who have not been reunited with their families. The solutions proposed include:
(a) Finding families for the most vulnerable children;
(b) Setting up income-generating activities for children to help them to become independent;
(c) Ensuring that those remaining with a foster family have a legal status that enables their long-term reintegration into society;
(d) Adoption carried out in accordance with the law, which can be the answer to some children’s problems. 
Guinea, Second periodic report to the Committee on the Rights of the Child, 18 April 2012, UN Doc. CRC/C/GIN/2, submitted 24 December 2009, §§ 176 and 182–183.
Guinea also stated:
471. Guinea has been greatly affected by the civil wars in Liberia and Sierra Leone that have raged since 24 December 1989. Faithfully observing international human rights agreements, the [1989] Convention [on the Rights of the Child] and the [1990] African Charter on the Rights and Welfare of the Child, Guinea has generously opened its doors to more than half a million refugees, including more than 305,000 children and young persons under 18 years of age (or 61 per cent of the refugee population), traumatized and hounded by a war that threatens their survival. They have been given shelter throughout the national territory, but especially in Guinée Forestière.
476. Although a large majority of these children are now placed in foster families, their specific needs as separated children have not been taken into account. However, their wellbeing has become a cause for concern today. To date, few specific programmes have been implemented to meet their needs.
477. The exact number of children affected by this situation is not known. IRC [International Rescue Committee] puts the number of separated children living in Guinea at more than 10,000.
482. Action taken:
- Placement of unaccompanied and separated children
487. There are also shelters and counselling centres for the physical and psychological rehabilitation of … refugee children in particular. 
Guinea, Second periodic report to the Committee on the Rights of the Child, 18 April 2012, UN Doc. CRC/C/GIN/2, submitted 24 December 2009, §§ 471, 476–477, 482 and 487.