Norma relacionada
Colombia
Practice Relating to Rule 11. Indiscriminate Attacks
Colombia’s Operational Law Manual (2009) states:
One of the main expressions of customary international humanitarian law are the fundamental guarantees. In this respect, the Constitutional Court has listed the following as fundamental guarantees:
(4) the prohibition of indiscriminate attacks[.] 
Colombia, Manual de Derecho Operacional Manual FF.MM. 3-41 Público, Primera Edición 2009, Comando General de las Fuerzas Militares, aprobado por el Comandante General de las Fuerzas Armadas por Disposición Número 056, 7 December 2009, pp. 36–37.
[footnotes in original omitted]
The manual further states: “Rules of engagement for land combat … 3. Weapons shall be used in a targeted way and not indiscriminately[.]” 
Colombia, Manual de Derecho Operacional Manual FF.MM. 3-41 Público, Primera Edición 2009, Comando General de las Fuerzas Militares, aprobado por el Comandante General de las Fuerzas Armadas por Disposición Número 056, 7 December 2009, p. 106.
Colombia’s Penal Code (2000) imposes a criminal sanction on “anyone who, during an armed conflict, carries out or orders the carrying out of indiscriminate attacks”. 
Colombia, Penal Code, 2000, Article 144.
In 2007, in the Constitutional Case No. C-291/07, the Plenary Chamber of Colombia’s Constitutional Court stated:
The principle of distinction is complex and encompasses a number of treaty and customary norms applicable in internal armed conflicts, in addition to, in many cases, enjoying ius cogens status. These rules [include] … the prohibition against indiscriminate attacks. 
Colombia, Constitutional Court, Constitutional Case No. C-291/07, Judgment of 25 April 2007, pp. 84–86; see also p. 94.
The Court further held:
The protection of civilians against indiscriminate attacks is a norm of customary international law applicable in all international or internal armed conflicts. Indiscriminate attacks are never justified, even when non-civilians or combatants are present among a civilian population. 
Colombia, Constitutional Court, Constitutional Case No. C-291/07, Judgment of 25 April 2007, p. 94.
(footnote in original omitted)
In 2010, in the El Iguano case, the Justice and Peace Chamber of Colombia’s High District Court of Bogotá convicted a member of the paramilitary group Autodefensas Unidas de Colombia (United Self-Defence Forces of Colombia) of several crimes committed against the civilian population. The Court stated:
The rules prohibiting the destruction and appropriation of protected objects derive from the principles of proportionality and distinction enshrined in IHL and according to which the opposing parties cannot choose whatever means of warfare they might wish nor carry out or order indiscriminate attacks. 
Colombia, High District Court of Bogotá, El Iguano case, Judgment, 2 December 2010, § 234.