Norma relacionada
Canada
Practice Relating to Rule 109. Search for, Collection and Evacuation of the Wounded, Sick and Shipwrecked
Canada’s LOAC Manual (1999) states: “Following an engagement, parties to a conflict are obliged to take all possible measures to search for and collect the wounded and sick and shipwrecked.” 
Canada, The Law of Armed Conflict at the Operational and Tactical Level, Office of the Judge Advocate General, 1999, p. 9-1, § 8.
The manual also provides: “If circumstances permit, the parties to a conflict must endeavour to conclude local agreements for the removal from besieged areas of wounded [and] sick”. 
Canada, The Law of Armed Conflict at the Operational and Tactical Level, Office of the Judge Advocate General, 1999, p. 6-4, § 35.
The manual adds:
In the case of land engagement, agreements between commanders, whether by armistice or cease-fire, may be made for the exchange, removal and transport of the wounded left on the field. In both land and sea engagements, arrangements may also be made for the removal of the wounded and sick from a besieged area and for the passage of medical personnel and chaplains proceeding to such an area. 
Canada, The Law of Armed Conflict at the Operational and Tactical Level, Office of the Judge Advocate General, 1999, p. 9-1, § 10.
In the case of non-international armed conflicts, the manual states: “After an engagement and whenever circumstances permit, all possible steps must be taken without delay to search for and collect the wounded, sick and shipwrecked.” 
Canada, The Law of Armed Conflict at the Operational and Tactical Level, Office of the Judge Advocate General, 1999, p. 17-4, § 32.
Canada’s Code of Conduct (2001) instructs soldiers “to take all possible measures to search for and collect the wounded and sick from all sides, opposing forces or not, as well as civilians”. 
Canada, Code of Conduct for CF Personnel, Office of the Judge Advocate General, 4 June 2001, Rule 7, § 3.
The Code of Conduct also states: “Whenever circumstances permit, a suspension of fire shall be arranged or local arrangements made to permit the removal of the sick, wounded and dead, and the exchange and transport of the wounded and sick.” 
Canada, Code of Conduct for CF Personnel, Office of the Judge Advocate General, 4 June 2001, Rule 7, § 3.
Canada’s LOAC Manual (2001) states in its chapter on land warfare: “If circumstances permit, the parties to a conflict must endeavour to conclude local agreements for the removal from besieged areas of wounded, sick, infirm, and aged persons, children and maternity cases.” 
Canada, The Law of Armed Conflict at the Operational and Tactical Levels, Office of the Judge Advocate General, 13 August 2001, § 614.6.
In its chapter on the treatment of the wounded, sick and shipwrecked, the manual states:
904. Collection of wounded, sick and shipwrecked
1. Following an engagement, parties to a conflict are obliged to take all possible measures to search for and collect without delay the wounded, sick and shipwrecked.
3. In the case of a land engagement, agreements between commanders, whether by armistice or cease-fire, may be made for the exchange, removal and transport of the wounded left on the field. In both land and sea engagements, arrangements may also be made for the removal of the wounded and sick from a besieged area and for the passage of medical personnel and chaplains proceeding to such an area
913. Obligation when compelled to abandon wounded and sick
1. In land warfare, a belligerent compelled to abandon its wounded and sick is obliged, so far as military considerations permit, to leave medical personnel and equipment to care for them. Their presence does not, however, exempt the Detaining Power from providing any additional assistance that may be necessary. 
Canada, The Law of Armed Conflict at the Operational and Tactical Levels, Office of the Judge Advocate General, 13 August 2001, §§ 904.1, 904.3 and 913.1.
In its chapter on non-international armed conflicts, the manual states:
By Common Article 3, the parties to a non-international armed conflict occurring in the territory of a party to the Conventions are obliged to apply, as a minimum, the following provisions:
b. The wounded and sick shall be collected and cared for. 
Canada, The Law of Armed Conflict at the Operational and Tactical Levels, Office of the Judge Advocate General, 13 August 2001, § 1708.1.
In the same chapter, the manual further provides: “After any engagement and whenever circumstances permit, all possible steps must be taken without delay to search for and collect the wounded, sick and shipwrecked”. 
Canada, The Law of Armed Conflict at the Operational and Tactical Levels, Office of the Judge Advocate General, 13 August 2001, § 1718.
Canada’s Prisoner of War Handling and Detainees Manual (2004) states: “Wounded and sick PW [prisoners of war] are to be evacuated through the same casualty evacuation system as [Canadian] troops. Ambulances are not to be used to transport fit PW.” 
Canada, Prisoner of War Handling, Detainees, Interrogation and Tactical Questioning in International Operations, B-GJ-005-110/FP-020, National Defence Headquarters, 1 August 2004, p. 3B-5, § B006.2.d.
Canada’s Code of Conduct (2005) instructs soldiers:
Following an engagement in which you were involved, you have an obligation, without delay, to take all possible measures to search for and collect the wounded and sick from all sides, opposing forces or not, as well as civilians. It is understood however that this obligation only comes into play once the area has been secured. This includes the obligation to protect them against theft and ill-treatment and to ensure their adequate care. There is also an obligation to search for, protect and pay proper respect for the dead. Whenever circumstances permit, a suspension of fire shall be arranged or local arrangements made to permit the removal of the sick, wounded and dead, and the exchange and transport of the wounded and sick. 
Canada, Code of Conduct for CF Personnel, Office of the Judge Advocate General, 2005, Rule 7, § 3.